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Mash rake

Mash rake (Accepted)

Mash rake (Accepted)

A mash rake is a tool used by brewers, with a long handle and cross-barred tines.  It was used to churn the mash and keep it well mixed while steeping.  The mash rake was the attribute of St. Arnold of Soissons:  the illustration was taken from a mid-15th C. image of the saint, in the Museum of Fine Arts, Ghent.  A similar artifact, possibly a mash rake, is found in the arms of Meilenhofter, mid-16th Century [NW 47].  For related charges, see fork.

The Baron of Mordenvale’s Company of Brewers bears:  Per chevron vert and gules, two mash rakes in saltire Or.

Iago Cabrera de Cadiz bears:  Sable, a mash rake Or.

Giles Ballard bears:  Gules, a mash rake argent.

This entry was posted on May 21, 2014, in .

Mask

Mask of comedy (Accepted); mask of tragedy (Accepted)

Mask of comedy (Accepted); mask of tragedy (Accepted)

Commedia dell'arte mask (Accepted)

Commedia dell’arte mask (Accepted)

A mask is an item of clothing that covers the face, usually to hide the wearer’s identity.  Though period artifacts, masks don’t seem to have been known to period armory.

 

In Society armory, common forms of mask include the “masks of comedy and tragedy” or “Thespian masks”, from ancient Greek theatre; the “domino mask” from the Italian Renaissance; and the “half-face mask” or “commedia dell’arte mask”, worn by commedia players in the late 16th Century.

 

 

Domino mask (Accepted); Pierrot mask (Disallowed)

Domino mask (Accepted); Pierrot mask (Disallowed)

The Society also has examples of the full-face “Pierrot mask”.  However, the character of Pierrot didn’t exist until the late 17th Century, and no examples of his mask have been found from before the 19th Century.  The Pierrot mask is thus no longer registerable as a charge.

Masks in general are guardant by Society default; the exception is the commedia dell’arte mask, which is shown in profile by default, the better to show its grotesque features.

For related charges, see eyeglasses, head (human’s), hood.

Marc Phillippe bears:  Or chapé gules, a domino mask pean.

Hal of the Mask bears:  Sable, a tragic mask Or, featured sable.

Gino di Palcoscenico bears:  Or, a commedia dell’arte mask in profile reversed sable, hatted and plumed gules.

Edwyn the Player bears:  Per pale gules and azure, a partisan spear Or, overall a Pierrot mask argent, orbed and capped sable, with lips gules.

Laurentina of Atenveldt bears:  Per bend sinister wavy azure and argent, a mask of comedy and a mask of tragedy within a bordure invected all counterchanged.

This entry was posted on May 21, 2014, in .

Masoning

Masoning (Period)

Masoning (Period)

Masoning is a field treatment whose lines resemble the mortaring in a brick wall, as seen in the arms of von Wirsberg, 1605 [Siebmacher 104].  In Society armory, its most significant use is upon a field (as in the illustration), but it may also be applied to charges.  Stone edifices (e.g., castles) are often blazoned “masoned”, but in such cases the treatment is considered artistic license: a stonework charge may be drawn masoned whether the blazon says so or no.

The Calontir War College bears:  Purpure masoned Or.

The Shire of Perilous Journey bears:  Argent masoned gules, a laurel wreath vert within a bordure gules.

Cuilén Ó Cinnéide bears:  Per bend sinister indented argent and gules masoned argent.

This entry was posted on May 21, 2014, in .

Match, slow

Slow match flammant (Period)

Slow match flammant (Period)

A slow match is a flammable cord, used for lighting matchlock rifles.  It’s drawn wound into a roll or annulet of cord.  The slow match is found as a charge in the arms of Leete, 1632 [Guillim2 334], and is accepted for Society use.

Eadmond du Battlemont bears:  Per pale embattled gules and Or, to dexter a handgonne rest Or and to sinister a slow match, ends in chief enflamed proper.

Dougall Cameron bears:  Or, a slow match azure and in chief five gunstones.

This entry was posted on May 21, 2014, in .

Maunch

Maunch (Period)

Maunch (Period)

A maunch, or maunche, is an ancient heraldic charge, representing a highly stylized sleeve.  As such, it has a standard heraldic form which is used in the Society:  the wrist is to dexter, and the elbow bent to base, by default.  The maunch was used as early as c.1255, in the arms of Hastings [Asp2 221].

A “dextrochère” is a maunch with a hand issuant from the cuff.  This motif was more common in France and the Low Countries, as seen in the arms of Luesninge or Lösenich, c.1370 [Gelre 32v].  See also clothing.

The Order of the Maunch, of the East, bears:  Per pale Or and purpure, a maunch counterchanged.

Aldith Angharad St. George bears:  Per bend sinister gules and ermine, two maunches counterchanged.

Rose de la Mans bears:  Per pale vert and sable, three maunches argent.

John of Hróðgerisfjörðr bears:  Checky gules and argent, three maunches sable.

This entry was posted on May 21, 2014, in .

Mermaid; Melusine

Mermaid in her vanity (Period)

Mermaid in her vanity (Period)

The mermaid is a seamonster, with the body of a maiden conjoined to a fish’s tail; it was also termed a “siren”.  It is usually depicted with a mirror and comb, which position may be blazoned “a mermaid in its vanity”.  The mermaid is found as a supporter in the early 14th Century [Dennys 123]; as a charge on a shield, it’s used in the arms of Ornelas, c.1540 [Nobreza xxiiiº].

It can also be male, of course; the male form may be blazoned a “merman” or a “triton”.  It too is found in period grants, dating from at least 1483 as a supporter of Wydville, Earl Rivers [Dennys 129]; it’s also found as a supporter of the Worshipful Company of Fishmongers, 1575 [Bromley & Child 91].  The merman is frequently armored, in some cases with his entire human half covered in plate.  Both mermaid and merman are affronty by default; period heraldic art turns the figure ever so slightly to dexter, in an early attempt at perspective.

Monk-fish naiant (Accepted)

Monk-fish naiant (Accepted)

Melusine (Period)

Melusine (Period)

One specific form of merman is blazoned a “monk-fish”, with the human portion vested in monk’s robes.  The form shown here is taken from Meidenbach’s Hortus Sanitatis, an herbal/natural history dated 1491.  As an heraldic charge, the monk-fish appears to be unique to the Society.

A Continental version of the mermaid is the “melusine”, which has two fish’s tails replacing the maiden’s legs, instead of a single fish’s tail; it is a period charge, found in the arms of Östermayr, 1605 [Siebmacher 36].  The melusine’s default posture is affronty, holding one tail in each hand.  Unlike the mermaid, the melusine is sometimes shown in period emblazons with her human half vested.

When blazoned “proper”, merfolk are tinctured with Caucasian (pink) human parts, and green fish’s tails; the hair color is usually explicitly blazoned, but blonde seems most common.  See also silkie.

The College of Saint Giles bears as a badge:  A monk-fish naiant to sinister argent.

Ane-Marie Varre of Helsingor bears:  Azure, a mermaid and a merman affronty proper, their adjacent arms elevated and crossed.

Astridr Selr Leifsdottír bears:  Azure, a melusine with hands clasped at her breast argent, crined and tailed, and in chief three estoiles of eight rays Or.

This entry was posted on May 22, 2014, in .

Mill

Mill (Period)

Mill (Period)

A mill is a facility for grinding or crushing.  The term usually refers to a grist mill, for grinding grain into flour:  it consists of one or more large circular stones (“millstones”), mounted on an axle, and turned by wind, water, or animals.  The mill is a period charge, found in the canting arms (German Mühle, “mill”) of von Uhrmuhl, 1605 [Siebmacher 98].  In this form, the axle is vertical, with a balancing beam on top.  For related charges, see grindstone.  See also windmill.

Leikr hrafnasveltir bears:  Or, a mill sable.

Eadric the Younger bears:  Per chevron vert and azure, on a chevron argent three mills palewise sable.

This entry was posted on May 22, 2014, in .

Millrind

Two millrinds (both Period)

Two millrinds (both Period)

A millrind is an heraldic representation of the iron struts that hold a millstone together.  It is also called a “fer-de-moline” or “inkmoline”.  The millrind is a common charge in mundane heraldry, dating from the mid-13th Century in the arms of Bek [Wagner 47].  In this earliest form, it was identical to the charge now called the cross moline.  By the end of period, the millrind had several variant forms, distinct from crosses.  The illustration shows two of the more common forms.  See also anille.

The Order of the Millrind, of Æthelmearc, bears:  A millrind argent.

Katherine of Bristol bears:  Per pale sable and Or, three millrinds counterchanged.

Aloric Everard bears:  Per pale argent and sable, semy of millrinds counterchanged.

Kersteken Arends bears:  Purpure, in pale three millrinds argent.

This entry was posted on May 22, 2014, in .

Mirror

Hand mirror (Period)

Hand mirror (Period)

A mirror is a polished pane of metal or glass, set in a frame, and used to look at oneself.  The standard heraldic form is more fully termed a “hand mirror”:  shown in later period with a handle attached to the frame, as in the arms of Sybell, 1531 [Gwynn-Jones 69], but earlier as a simple circular framed mirror, as in the canting arms (German Spiegel) of Spiegel c.1370 [Gelre 29v].  In either of these forms, the mirror is the traditional accoutrement of the mermaid.

Period armory also has examples of “wall mirrors”, mounted in large rectangular frames, as in the arms of von Steuben or Stuben c.1450 [Ingeram 136, also Siebmacher 117].

The Order of the Mermaids Pearl of Trimaris bears:  Argent, a handmirror azure silvered argent.

Branwen MacRae bears:  Argent, a handmirror bendwise sinister sable, issuant from the glass tongues of flame proper.

Ailís inghean Mhuirgein bears:  Vert, on a mirror argent glassed vert, an oak leaf argent.

This entry was posted on May 22, 2014, in .

Mole

Mole (Period)

Mole (Period)

The mole is a burrowing beast, described as blind in medieval bestiaries; it was considered the archetype of secrecy (since it labors underground).  It was also called a “moldiwarp” [Franklyn 232].  The mole is a period charge, dating from c.1480 in the arms of Metford [DBA2 296].  From the examples in Guillim, 1632 [211], and Parker [411], it would seem that the mole’s default posture is tergiant fesswise, as in the illustration; for Society purposes, it’s probably best to be explicit.

Elizabeth Carpenter of Rye bears:  Argent, a mole tergiant descending proper within a bordure vert.

Andrew of York bears:  Barry azure and argent, a mole rampant sable.

This entry was posted on May 22, 2014, in .