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Zule

Zule (Period)

Zule (Period)

A zule is a stylized representation of a column or support.  Its original function is unclear:  some scholars believe it to represent a balustrade pillar, while others consider it a table trellis.  The charge was originally from Dutch armory (Dutch zuil, “column”); it was introduced to England during the reign of William of Orange, where it was confused with the chess rook.  Many texts thus give “zule” as a synonym for “chess rook”; but the two are actually distinct charges.

The illustration is taken from the canting arms of van Zuylen, c.1370 [Gelre 88v].

The Orde van de Zuil, of the Barony of Red Spears, bears:  Per pale purpure and argent, a zule counterchanged.

Jorgen Gruuendale bears:  Per pale Or and gules, a zule counterchanged.

Lemoine de Gascony bears as a badge:  A zule sable.

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Xonecuilli

Xonecuilli (Disallowed)

Xonecuilli (Disallowed)

A xonecuilli is an Aztec motif representing a blue worm; it is palewise by Society default.  The xonecuilli is not found in mundane heraldry, and is no longer registerable.  It is defined in the following armory.

John the Idiota bears:  Or, a xonecuilli azure.

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Winged charges

Winged tower (Period)

Winged tower (Period)

Occasionally, inanimate charges may be shown with a pair of wings attached.  Period examples include the winged column in the arms of von Oberndorff, c.1560 [BSB Cod.Icon 390:772]; the winged mount of six hillocks, in the arms of Lugarini, c.1550 [BSB Cod.Icon 278:423]; and the winged arrow in the arms of Zinngall or Zingel, c.1600 [BSB Cod.Icon 307:536].  By default, the wings will be eagle’s wings displayed, of comparable size to the charge.  The wings are attached to the charge on its dexter and sinister sides; the exception seems to be for winged shoes, feet, &c, where the wings are addorsed and attached near the heel.  The illustration shows a winged tower, as in the arms of Baldovini, c.1550 [BSB Cod.Icon 274:339].  See also winged monsters.

Uther vom Schwartzwald bears:  Sable, a winged chalice Or.

Denys Calais bears:  Gules, a key Or winged argent.

Bronwyn Schutelisworth bears:  Or, a weaver’s shuttle palewise vert winged sable.

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Wheel

Wheel (Period)

Wheel (Period)

Dexter half of a wheel (Period)

Dexter half of a wheel (Period)

A wheel is a circular spoked frame, attached to an axle by its hub and permitted to spin freely.  Sets of wheels are normally found attached to wagons, but wheels are often found as charges in their own right.  The default wheel is more fully blazoned a “wagon-wheel” or “cartwheel”; it’s found as early as c.1340, in the arms of Berg [Zurich 232].  The number of spokes is usually left to the license of the artist – six or eight spokes seem to be the norm – but sometimes the number is explicitly blazoned.  The wheel’s “proper” coloration is brown, the color of wood.

Particularly in German heraldry, we find examples of partial wheels:  a quarter-wheel, as in the arms of von Billick, 1605 [Siebmacher 71], or a half-wheel, as in the arms of Rusetzker [Siebmacher 73].  The orientation of the partial wheel (e.g., “dexter half of a wheel”, as in the illustration) must be specified in blazon.

Catherine's wheel (Period)

Catherine’s wheel (Period)

Cog-wheel (Period)

Cog-wheel (Period)

Variants of the wheel include the “Catherine’s wheel”, the symbol of the martyr St. Catherine, with curved knife-blades radiating from the rim.  As an heraldic charge, it’s found in the arms of Brentingham, Bishop of Exeter 1370-94 [DBA3 443].  There is the “cog-wheel”, also called a  “gear-wheel” or “mill-wheel”, with an embattled outer edge, used in mechanisms from tiny clockworks to giant mill-works; it’s found in the canting arms (German Mühle, “mill”) of Mülinen c.1460 [GATD 20v].

Water-wheel (Accepted)

Water-wheel (Accepted)

Finally, there is the “water-wheel”, unique to Society armory, with vanes on the outer edge to draw power from running water.  See also grindstone, spinning wheel.

Cyprian of the Wheel bears:  Argent, a wooden cartwheel of twelve spokes proper.

Caterine Barré de Venoix bears:  Barry azure and Or, a Catherine wheel gules.

Iathus of Scara bears:  Ermine, a cog wheel gules.

Patrick MacFynn bears:  Per chevron vert and azure, a chevron argent between two natural dolphins embowed respectant Or and a water wheel argent.

Catherine de la Loire bears:  Purpure, a Catherine’s wheel missing the dexter chief quarter between three fleurs-de-lys argent.

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Vessels

Vessels are hollow containers for holding easily spilled contents.  They come in a wide variety of shapes, depending on their intended purpose; they may be made of metal, wood, horn, ceramic or glass.  If glass is intended, the charge should not be drawn as though transparent, through the use of voiding or chasing, but should be solidly tinctured.

For specific entries, see:  amphora, apothecary jar, barrel, bottell, bottle, churn, cup, flask, horn (drinking), ink bottle, pitcher, pot, saltcellar, tankard, tub, urinal, vase.  For related charges, see bowl, bucket, caldera gringolada, cupping-glass, frying pan, hourglass, mortar and pestle, water-bouget.

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Valknut

Valknut (SFPP)

Valknut (SFPP)

A valknut is a Norse artistic motif, consisting of three triangles voided and interlaced.  It was associated with scenes of Odin and the Valkyries (valknut, “corpse knot”), and may have represented the slain warrior’s soul.  As an heraldic charge, it’s unique to the Society; its use is considered a step from period practice.  The valknut has its point is to chief by Society default; valknuts inverted are no longer permitted.

There were several depictions of the valknut in Norse art; the illustration is the one accepted for Society use.  It’s based on the image on the Stora Hammars I stone, in Gotland.  See also knot, polygon.

Styrbjorg Ulfethnar bears:  Argent, a demi-wolf salient proper charged on the shoulder with an elf-bolt argent, issuant from a valknut gules.

Hallgrímr Úlfsson bears:  Gules, a valknut and a bordure argent.

Justin Stephen Cradoc bears:  Quarterly azure and argent, four valknuts counterchanged.

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Vair-bell

Vair-bell (Disallowed)

Vair-bell (Disallowed)

A vair-bell is a single segment of the vair field.  As a charge, it would appear to be unique to Society armory, and is no longer registered.  The vair-bell is drawn in a stylized angular manner, with the point to chief.  See also bell, helm (kettle).

Ivan Brasonic bears:  Sable, a vair-bell inverted argent environed of eight plates in annulo.

Catherine of Greenfields bears:  Vert, a vair-bell Or, overall a raven’s quill bendwise sinister proper.

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Turning cratch

Turning cratch (Period)

Turning cratch (Period)

A turning cratch is a movable rack or crib, to hold fodder for feeding beasts out of doors.  It’s a period charge, found in the arms of Lamminger, 1605 [Siebmacher 89]; a slightly different form is found in the arms of von Hertenberg, c.1560 [BSB Cod.Icon 390:912].

Benedetta Meglino bears:  Sable, a turning cratch argent issuant from a trimount Or.

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Tricune

Tricune (Accepted)

Tricune (Accepted)

A tricune is a charge unique to Society heraldry, but said to be based on an old German-Norse design motif; it consists of three passion nails conjoined in pall inverted.

Uilleam Thorken Hardhans bears:  Azure, three forks two-tined and tangued Or, on a chief argent three tricunes sable.

Derich Brauer bears:  Quarterly argent and gules, two tricunes gules.

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Torch; Firebrand

Torch (Period)

Torch (Period)

Firebrand bendwise (Period)

Firebrand bendwise (Period)

A torch (also called a “flambeau”) is a source of light, consisting of a twist of hemp soaked in oil, and set in a holder; the holder was originally of wood, but by the end of period we find torches with long cylindrical metal holders used in processionals.  The torch is a period charge, found in the canting arms (German Fackel) of Fackelstein, c.1340 [Zurich 447], upon which the illustration is based.  The torch is always “enflamed”, or lit, even when not explicitly blazoned so.

A similar charge is the “firebrand”, which is simply a bit of burning wood.  It’s depicted as a ragged staff with the top end enflamed; sometimes the ragged bits on the sides are enflamed as well.  If blazoned “proper”, the brand is brown, the color of wood, with the flames gules and Or.  The firebrand is found in the canting arms of von Brandis as early as c.1370 [Gelre 97]; the illustration shows a firebrand bendwise.

Cresset (Period)

Cresset (Period)

Rushlight in its stand (Accepted)

Rushlight in its stand (Accepted)

There is also the “cresset” or “fire-basket”, a metal framework containing flame, as shown at the top of a beacon; it was a badge of John Holland, Duke of Exeter, d.1446 [HB 100], and of Henry V [Bedingfeld 129].  Finally, of Society-unique charges, we have the “rushlight”, a reed whose pith is soaked in oil, and whose upper end is lit.  (The illustration shows a lit rushlight mounted in a stand.)

For related charges, see brazier, candle, lamp, lantern.

Alan Stevenson bears:  Per pale argent and azure, three torches counterchanged.

Nikolaus Hildebrand bears:  Argent, a firebrand bendwise proper enflamed and an orle of fleurs-de-lys gules.

Richard Fenwick bears:  Argent, a rushlight bendwise proper, the dexter chief tip enflamed Or, supported by a three-legged iron stand sable.

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