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Vêtu

Vêtu (Period)

Vêtu (Period)

Vêtu ployé (Accepted)

Vêtu ployé (Accepted)

Vêtu (French for “vested”) is a Continental partition of the field, formed by two lines from center chief and two lines from the base point, connecting at the sides of the shield.  The partition thus strongly resembles a lozenge throughout; and it will conflict with a lozenge, all other things being the same.  But the vêtu field differs from a lozenge in one respect:  In normal usage, only the central part of the field is charged; the vested portions of the field remain uncharged.  (Despite this, there are still a number of vêtu fields in Society heraldry with charges in the corner portions.)

The standard vêtu field uses straight lines; there is also a variant, “vêtu ployé”, with arched lines.  For related entries, see chapé, chaussé.

Cealmhain Realt Dubh bears as a badge:  Argent vêtu ployé sable.

Damon Kirby bears:  Argent vêtu gules, four lozenges in cross gules.

Kareina Talvi Tytar bears:  Azure vêtu, a long-haired domestic cat dormant argent.

This entry was posted on June 8, 2014, in .

Vair

Vair, ancient (Period)

Vair, ancient (Period)

Vair, later period (Period)

Vair, later period (Period)

Vair is one of the principal furs in heraldry, consisting of a series of panes, alternately white and blue, completely tiling the field.  It was originally meant to represent squirrel-skins, sewn together with the back-fur and belly-fur alternating.  There are several varieties of vair, all of which are considered mere artistic variations of one another.

The earliest depiction of vair, dating from the Matthew Paris shields c.1244, had rounded edges.  Originally, the peaks didn’t touch the straight edges of the rows; by c.1400, the peaks might extend to the rows’ edges.  These depictions are sometimes termed “vair ancient” in modern heraldry texts; the stylization is not blazoned in Society armory, being left to the artist.  By the end of period, a more angular form of vair was used, tessellated with vair-bells; this form is the modern standard depiction.  Period heraldic tracts also gave names to different patterns of arranging the panes:  e.g., “counter-vair”, with the panes set base-to-base, and not alternating colors; and “vair en pointe”, with the panes staggered.  There are other forms as well, some of which came to be used in post-period armory.

Potent (Period)

Potent (Period)

One style of depicting vair came to be called “potent”, because the panes resembled potents or crutches.  Again, no difference is counted between vair and potent.

Vair furs may use other tinctures besides white and blue.  Such cases must be explicitly blazoned:  e.g., “Vairy Or and gules”, the canting arms of Ferrers, c.1244 [Asp2 222].  See also papellony, plumetty.

Kat’ryna Neblaga Volchkova bears:  Vair, flaunches gules.

Gauvain Eisenbein bears:  Vairy en point erminois and azure, a bordure gules.

Steven MacEanruig bears:  Potent, on a pile sable a cross crosslet argent.

This entry was posted on June 8, 2014, in .

Scaly

Scaly (Period)

Scaly (Period)

Scaly is a field treatment, consisting of many semi-circles or lunes, covering the field.  The term is the Society’s translation of the French term écaillée; it is equivalent to the most common depiction of the papellony field [Woodward 726].  The treatment is found in the arms of von Tettenbach, 1605 [Siebmacher 85].

Yrjo Kirjawiisas bears as a badge:  Sable scaly Or.

Uthyr Peregrine bears:  Per bend nebuly azure, and argent scaly sable.

Antonius Hasebroek bears:  Gules scaly Or.

This entry was posted on June 2, 2014, in .

Plumetty

Plumetty (Period)

Plumetty (Period)

Plumetty is a fur, evidently a variant of the vair furs; it is made up of panes resembling feathers.  Visually, it’s similar to a lozengy field, and its tinctures are blazoned the same way.  Plumetty is a period field, found in the arms of Mydlam, c.1460 [RH].

The interior details of the feathers are diapering, and are considered artistic license.  When no internal details are shown, plumetty becomes very close to a form of papellony.  See also field treatment.

Duncan Brock of Greyfeather bears:  Plumetty argent and sable, on a fess purpure a brock statant argent.

Damian Papyngeye bears:  Plumetty argent and vert, a popinjay purpure.

This entry was posted on May 23, 2014, in .