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Yoke

Yoke, British style (Period)

Yoke, British style (Period)

Yoke, German style (Period)

Yoke, German style (Period)

A yoke is the piece of harness equipment that connects two draft animals side-by-side; it’s sometimes more fully blazoned an “ox yoke”.  It’s a period charge, found in two somewhat different forms:  a Continental form, seen in the arms of von Mengersreuth, c.1370 [Gelre 44v; also Siebmacher 89]; and a British form, which was the badge of the Earls of Errol from at least the mid-16th Century [HB 99; also the Dunvegan Armorial, 1582, f.31].

The yoke is fesswise by default.  The British form, when “proper”, is colored brown, as with all wooden charges.

The Shire of Belle Rive bears as a badge:  An ox yoke, beamed vert, bowed argent.

Henricus Guotman bears:  Per fess wavy vert and purpure, in chief an ox yoke Or.

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Yarn

Clew of yarn (Period)

Clew of yarn (Period)

Hank of yarn (Period)

Hank of yarn (Period)

Yarn is a continuous length of fibers, spun or twisted, and used in the production of textiles.  It’s usually found as an adjunct to a spinner’s or seamstress’s tool:  e.g., a drop-spindle, niddy-noddy, quill of yarn, or shuttle.  However, when collected into a visible mass, yarn can be a charge in its own right.  One form is the simple “ball of yarn”, which Society heralds sometimes call a “clew of yarn” for the sake of a cant; the charge is found in the canting arms (Portuguese novelo) of Navaes or Novais, c.1540 [Nobreza xxviii].  Society practice grants no difference between a ball of yarn and a roundel.

There is also the “hank of yarn (or cotton)”, a skein of yarn wound and bound, as in the canting arms of Cotton, 1335 [DBA2 381; Parker 306].  The hank of yarn is palewise by default.  See also knot.

Elena Carlisle bears:  Per pall inverted Or, azure and argent, two domestic cats sejant guardant respectant counterchanged sable and argent and a ball of yarn azure.

Angharad Bach bears as a badge:  Azure, three clews of yarn quarterly Or and argent.

Isabel Moundoghter bears as a badge:  A clew of yarn pendant from a hank of cotton fesswise argent.

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Wheelbarrow

Wheelbarrow (Accepted)

Wheelbarrow (Accepted)

A wheelbarrow is a small handcart, with one or two wheels at one end and a pair of handles at the other, used for lifting and carrying loads (typically dirt, building materials, &c).  It’s a period artifact: the illustration is taken from Agricola’s De Re Metallica, 1556. However, no period examples of its use in heraldry are known.  The wheelbarrow is fesswise, with its wheel to dexter, by Society default.  For related charges, see wagon.

Hannes zum Eichhorn bears:  Per fess vert and Or, a wheelbarrow and an acorn counterchanged.

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Weinleiter

Weinleiter bendwise (Period)

Weinleiter bendwise (Period)

A weinleiter is a handbarrow for carrying wine barrels, consisting of two long poles with two crosspieces.  It’s a period charge, found in the arms of Vasant, 1605 [Siebmacher 106].  It doesn’t seem to have a default orientation; the illustration shows a weinleiter bendwise.

Tamara Samuilova of Thamesreach bears as a badge:  A weinleiter bendwise vert.

Hallr brjost Starsson bears as a badge:  Per pale Or and quarterly gules and argent, a weinleiter bendwise sinister sable.

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Water-bouget

Water-bouget (Period)

Water-bouget (Period)

A water-bouget is a pair of water bags on a yoke, drawn in a highly stylized heraldic form.  It is one of the most ancient of charges, dating from 1244 in the arms of de Ros (Roos, Ross, Rous) [Asp2 212].  There are several period depictions of the water-bouget; no difference is counted between them.  The illustration is taken from the Garter stall plate of Sir John Bourchier, d.1474.  See also bottell (leather).

Constance Grey bears:  Azure, three water-bougets Or.

Elspeth of Seal Cove bears:  Purpure, a water-bouget erminois.

Margaret de Mey bears:  Gules, three water-bougets argent.

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Wagon

Wagon (Period)

Wagon (Period)

Covered wagon (Accepted)

Covered wagon (Accepted)

A wagon is a four-wheeled cart for carrying goods, usually made to be drawn by a horse or ox; it’s also known simply as a “cart”.  Its “proper” coloration is brown, the color of wood; it faces dexter by default.  The examples from period armory, as in the arms of de Brambilla, mid-15th C. [Triv 69], show open grates for the wagon’s sides; most wagons in Society armory have solid sides.

A two-wheeled variant, the “oxcart” (Italian baroccio), is found in the canting arms of di Barozi, mid-15th C. [Triv 76].

Pageant wagon (Accepted)

Pageant wagon (Accepted)

War-wagon (Accepted)

War-wagon (Accepted)

Society variants of the wagon include the “covered wagon”, with a cloth covering stretched over circular hoops; the illustration is taken from the Douce psalter, c.1320.  Similar is the “pageant wagon”, a wheeled performance stage, with curtains and ornamentation, used in 15th Century England.  Finally, there’s the “war-wagon”, with an embattled top and arrow slits.  None of these variants have yet been attested in period armory; moreover, the pageant wagon carries a step from period practice.  For related charges, see wheelbarrow.

Æsa the Fierce bears:  Vert, a wagon within an annulet argent.

Gunnora Aldyne bears:  Azure, on a pale between two carts argent, a mouse rampant azure.

Gavin Reynes bears:  Or, a pageant wagon gules, its pennon staves and pennons azure, and its frontal curtain azure charged with a cross Or.

Alail Horsefriend bears as a badge:  Per fess azure and argent, a war-wagon counterchanged and enflamed to sinister chief proper.

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Vase

Vase (Period)

Vase (Period)

A vase is a decorative vessel, generally taller than it is wide, and frequently double-handled; holding flowers was just one of its uses.  It’s a period charge, found in the arms of Sodré, c.1540 [Nobreza xxxvº], and of von Könder, 1605 [Siebmacher 161]; a vase without handles (and bearing flowers) is found in the arms of Fogler or Vogler, c.1560 [BSB Cod.Icon 390:715].

Society armory also has the “urn”, more used for storage than display:  similar in shape to the vase but somewhat broader in proportion, and usually without handles.  For related charges, see amphora.

Thomas Tarn Travis bears:  Per pale embattled Or and vert, in fess a tree and a vase counterchanged.

Richard of Havn bears:  Vert, upon a plate two urns azure, a base indented Or.

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Tub

Tub (Period)

Tub (Period)

Bathtub (Period)

Bathtub (Period)

A tub is a wide, low vessel, made of wooden staves or metal; it was usually used for washing, either clothes or persons; in essence, it’s the lower half of an upright barrel.  Tubs are period charges, found in the allusive arms of von Wasserburg, c.1340 [Zurich 371]; a form of tub with handles is found in the arms of Mastellizi, c.1550 [BSB Cod.Icon 269].

There is also the “bath tub”, specifically for washing people.  This too turns out to be a period charge, in arms of von Suls or Sulz, c.1340 [Zurich 89].  For related charges, see bucket.

The Province of Caldarium bears:  Or, on a wooden tub between two peacock feathers crossed in base proper, a laurel wreath Or.

Jorunn Eydisardottir bears:  Vert, a tub Or and a ford proper.

Mariah Stern bears:  Azure mullety Or, in pale a rainbow proper and a bath tub Or.

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Trivet

Trivet (Period)

Trivet (Period)

Triangular trivet (Period)

Triangular trivet (Period)

A trivet is a three-legged stand for holding cooking pots, &c.  Trivets are often ornamental, and may be round or triangular; the round form is older in period armory, found in the canting arms of Tryvette as early as 1295 [ANA2 552].  The triangular form is specified in Society blazon.

 

The trivet is normally drawn in an early attempt at perspective, showing the top to the viewer, with all three legs visible.

 

Tripod (Period)

Tripod (Period)

Society armory also has the “tripod”, similar to the trivet, but larger and tetrahedral in outline; it encloses its load, instead of resting underneath it.  The tripod is never used alone, but only in conjunction with another charge (typically a cooking pot), which it supports.  The arms of Larrea, mid-16th C., show a cauldron so suspended [Armeria 358].

Alastar Scott MacCrummin bears:  Or, three triangular trivets azure.

Gwenhwyvar ferch Owen ap Morgan bears:  Per chevron argent and azure, a triangular trivet argent.

Brekke Franksdottir bears:  Sable, a cooking pot hanging from a tripod above a flame in base argent.

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Thimble

Thimble (Accepted)

Thimble (Accepted)

A thimble is a small bit of metal or leather, worn on the fingertip to protect it from needles’ ends.  A common medieval form, dating from the 14th Century, was a pitted brass dome; this form of thimble has been accepted for Society use.  Such thimbles are shown being made in the Hausbuch der Mendelschen, c.1480 [Geoff Egan, The Medieval Household: Daily Living c.1150-c.1450, 1998, p.264]; but no examples of their heraldic use have been found.  The thimble opens to base by Society default.

Kerry RanAurora bears:  Per fess Or and azure, atop a thimble argent a frog sejant affronty gules.

Anastasie de Lamoure bears:  Azure, three thimbles and on a chief argent a needle fesswise azure.

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