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Door

Door (Period)

Door (Period)

Open doors on doorframe (Period)

Open doors on stooped arch (Period)

A door is an entrance to a room or edifice.  It is hinged along one side, and usually has a ringed handle or a keyhole on the other.  It is left to the artist whether the hinged side is on the dexter or sinister side of the door.

The door may be drawn without a frame, as in the arms of Portinari, c.1475 [Huntington Library art collection]; however, in period emblazons, the door is more frequently found inset into an arch or wall.  The canting arms of Portenau or Portnaw, c.1460 [GATD 18], with open double-doors hinged on an arch, was a common heraldic motif for doors.

See also drawbridge, gate, portcullis.

Galen Litelpage of Redore bears:  Argent masoned sable, an arched door gules, banded and handled azure.

Kenneth Underhwealf bears:  Or, a wooden door proper, hinged, latched and padlocked, in base a key fesswise, wards to sinister sable.

Aleksandr Vasilyevich Lev bears:  Azure, a lion rampant guardant maintaining a patriarchal crozier, within a stooped arch, doors open, all Or.

This entry was posted on January 12, 2014, in .

Dove

Dove (Period)

Dove (Period)

The dove is a bird related to the pigeon, with a soft cooing cry.  It is often used as a symbol of peace, and thus is sometimes shown with an olive slip in its mouth, as in the arms of the Worshipful Company of Tallow Chandlers, 1456 [Bromley & Child 237].  In heraldic art, the dove is distinguished by a small curled tuft on top of its head.  The dove’s “proper” coloration is white, with pink (some sources say gules) beak and legs; its default posture is close.

“Descending” is a special term applied to doves, equivalent to “migrant to base”.  A “paraclete” is a dove portrayed as the Holy Spirit:  descending and with a halo.

Francesca of Bright Angel bears:  Azure, a dove displayed, head elevated argent.

Serena Fabrizio bears:  Sable, three doves volant contourny argent.

James de St. Germain bears:  Purpure, upon a chevron argent beneath a paraclete descending proper three crosses of Lorraine sable.

This entry was posted on January 12, 2014, in .

Dragon

Dragon (Period)

Dragon (Period)

Wyvern (Period)

Wyvern (Period)

The dragon is a great reptilian monster with spikes, barbs, bat-wings, and taloned feet.  It is sometimes blazoned a “wyrm”, especially for the sake of a cant.  A dragon “segreant” is rampant, wings addorsed; this is its default posture.

The dragon’s depiction differed over the centuries, or between countries.  The earliest heraldic dragons, for instance, had feathered wings.  The dragon’s tail was blunt throughout our period; the barbs at the end were not added until the 18th Century.  (This is considered artistic license, and many Society dragons have barbed tails.)

More important is the number of legs.  The Society, following current British usage, defines a “dragon” as having four legs.  The four-legged dragon had been a badge of North Wales c.1400; with the ascension of the Tudors, the four-legged dragon became one of England’s supporters [Dennys 191].  However, the older form of dragon had only two legs; it dates back at least to 1300, in the arms of Fulbourne [ANA2 493].  British heraldry now blazons the two-legged form a “wyvern” (Continental heralds still call it a “dragon”), and treats it as a variant of type.  The wyvern’s default posture is variously blazoned “statant” or “sejant”:  for wyverns, the two postures are deemed equivalent.  The Society grants no difference between the four-legged dragon and the two-legged wyvern, since both were considered dragons in period.

Oriental dragon passant (SFPP)

Oriental dragon passant (SFPP)

Dûn dragon (Disallowed)

Dûn dragon (Disallowed)

There are other variations of the dragon.  The “hydra” is a multi-headed dragon; classically described with nine heads, the 16th Century heraldic form has as few as three [de Bara 85, 143].  (The number of heads should be blazoned.)  The “Oriental dragon” is wingless, and drawn in a Chinese or Japanese stylization; its use in Society armory is considered a step from period practice.  Finally, the “Dûn dragon” is a Society invention, with no wings, two horns, long spindly limbs, and a dopy grin; it is defined in the arms of the Shire of Anlieplic Dûn.  This form is no longer used save for the Shire’s armory.

Dragons and wyverns displayed are considered a step from period practice; dragons volant are not permitted.  For related charges, see amphisbaena, cockatrice, griffin, lion-dragon, Norse beasts, orm, pithon.

The King of the Middle bears:  Argent, a pale gules, overall a dragon passant vert, in chief an ancient crown Or within a laurel wreath proper.

The Baron of Wyvernwoode bears:  Vert, a wyvern passant argent, winged and bellied within a laurel wreath Or.

The Shire of Anlieplic Dûn bears:  Per pale sable and argent, a laurel wreath between two Dûn dragons combattant counterchanged.

Éowyn Amberdrake bears:  Azure, in pale three dragons passant Or.

Katrina Pietroff bears:  Azure, a seven-headed hydra statant argent.

This entry was posted on January 14, 2014, in .

Drawbridge

Drawbridge (Period)

Drawbridge (Period)

A drawbridge is a type of bridge with a section of its span able to be raised or lowered.  It was typically used to control access to a castle or other fortification.  The drawbridge is a period charge, found in the canting arms of da Ponte, mid-15th C. [Triv 278].  By default, it’s depicted as though seen from above.  See also door, gate.

Illuminada Eugenia de Guadalupe y Godoy bears as a badge:  Sable, a drawbridge Or.

This entry was posted on January 14, 2014, in .

Drawer-handle

Drawer-handle (Accepted, probable SFPP); slice of melon (Period, probable SFPP)

Drawer-handle (Accepted, probable SFPP); slice of melon (Period, probable SFPP)

The term “drawer-handle” (kan) is a modern term for a portion of a period charge in Japanese Mon:  it seems to be taken from the mokko, or “slice of melon” (Dower’s Elements of Japanese Design).  While we have no examples of the drawer-handle (in the illustration, the charge in chief) in period Mon, the mokko (the charge in base) is found in the Mon of Oda Hidenobu, d.1601 [Hawley 18].

In Mon, both the drawer-handle and the melon slice are used in multiples, not singly, and conjoined in annulo.

Kimura Tetsuo bears:  Sable, a plate issuant from a Japanese stream, within five drawer-handles conjoined in annulo argent.

This entry was posted on January 14, 2014, in .

Drawknife

Drawknife (Period)

Drawknife (Period)

A drawknife is a carpenter’s tool for smoothing wood, consisting of a long-edged knife with a handle at either end.  It’s a period charge, found in the canting arms (German schaben, “to scrape”) of von Schaben, 1605 [Siebmacher 139].  The drawknife is fesswise, handles and cutting edge to base, by default.  For related charges, see shave.  See also float, plane.

Alrikr Timber-quaker bears:  Per saltire gules and sable, a drawknife and a bordure dovetailed argent.

Abrahe çaragoça bears:  Or, on a fess dovetailed gules a drawknife Or.

Ailill mac Duib Dara bears as a badge:  A drawknife argent.

This entry was posted on January 14, 2014, in .

Drop-spindle

Drop-spindle (Period)

Drop-spindle (Period)

A drop-spindle is a rod set in a whorl, used as a tool for winding fiber into thread by hand.  It’s a period charge, found in the canting arms of von Spindlwerg, mid-16th C [NW 137].  Guillim, 1610 [204], also terms it a “wharrow-spindle” or “fuseau”, and assigns it to the canting arms of Trefusis.

The drop-spindle is shown with a load of thread by default; the fact is sometimes explicitly blazoned, e.g., a “threaded” or “full” drop-spindle.  Empty drop-spindles are permitted, but must be so specified.

The period form of drop-spindle, with a small whorl and ellipsoidal load of thread (as in the illustration), is the preferred form for Society armory; the modern form, with a large disc-shaped or cone-shaped whorl and conical load, is no longer permitted.

For related charges, see lace bobbin, quill of yarn.  See also distaff, shuttle (weaver’s), spinning wheel, yarn.

Helva of Saxony bears:  Vert, a full drop-spindle argent.

Heiritha Cobbley of Stanford bears:  Per bend sinister azure and sable, a drop-spindle bendwise argent.

Scolastica la souriete bears as a badge:  A drop-spindle sable, threaded ermine.

This entry was posted on January 14, 2014, in .

Drum

Drum (Period)

Drum (Period)

Dumbeg (Accepted)

Dumbeg (Accepted)

A drum is a musical instrument of the percussion family; it usually consists of a hollow wooden cylinder with at least one end covered by a stretched membrane.  It’s a period charge, found in the canting arms (French tambour) of Jehan Tabourot, d.1595.  (Tabourot is better known under his pseudonym of Thoinot Arbeau; he blazons his arms in the dedication of his Orchésographie.  See also Woodward 383.)  The illustration is taken from the example in Guillim, 1610 [224].  The default drum, used in war and processionals, was a “side drum”, or in modern terms, a tenor drum; it’s palewise by default, with the drumhead to chief.

Society armory gives examples of the “dumbeg” (“dumbek”, “doumbec”), a goblet-shaped drum found in Muslim lands, often used as accompaniment for dancers.  The dumbeg itself does not appear to be a period instrument, but it belongs to a class of Muslim goblet drums collectively known as darabukka, which are period:  an example is found in the Cantigas de Santa Maria of Alfonso the Wise, late-13th Century (from which the illustration is taken).  Society blazons continue to use the term “dumbeg” for continuity’s sake.

Tambour (Accepted); timbrel (Accepted)

Tambour (Accepted); timbrel (Accepted)

Kettle drum (Accepted)

Kettle drum (Accepted)

Also found in Society armory is the “kettle drum” or “naker drum”, with a closed hemispherical body, as found in the Luttrell Psalter, c.1340.  We have the “tabor”, like the side drum but not as tall, worn on the hip and played together with a flute; examples of pipe-and-tabor players date back to c.1270 [Montagu 47].  The “tambour” is a wide shallow drum; when cymbals are mounted around the frame, it becomes a “tambourine” or “timbrel”, as seen on a relief by Agostino di Duccio, c.1454 [Remnant 165].

Drums, when blazoned “wooden [type of drum] proper”, have brown cylinders or frames, and argent drumheads, by Society convention; sometimes the drumhead is explicitly tinctured.

Geoffrey de Barde bears:  Sable, a drum argent.

Naila Kalilah bears:  Purpure, a serpent glissant bendwise Or between a dumbeg and a pair of zils argent.

Anna Kalita bears:  Purpure, two kettle drums in fess Or, in chief two drumsticks in saltire argent.

Sean Tabor bears:  Gules, a sword inverted argent piercing a tabor Or, a bordure per pale argent and Or.

Roger the Goliard bears as a badge:  Azure, on a demi-sun issuant from base Or in fess a mandolin bendwise sinister, a recorder bendwise, and a wood-framed tambourine all proper, in chief three doves volant argent.

This entry was posted on January 14, 2014, in .

Drumstick

Drumstick (Period)

Drumstick (Period)

A drumstick, as the name implies, is used to strike a drum to obtain its note.  Guillim, 1610 [224], describes its use as a charge, and it is therefore accepted for Society use.  The striking end of the drumstick, a knob which may be padded, is to chief by default.  For related charges, see dulcimer hammer.

The Musicians’ Guild of Gwyntarian bears:  Per pale dovetailed gules and azure, a set of panpipes, a rebec affronty and a bow in saltire, and a tabor and drumstick Or.

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Dulcimer hammer

Dulcimer hammer (Accepted)

Dulcimer hammer (Accepted)

A dulcimer hammer is a slender stick with a curved striking surface, used to play the dulcimer.  Though a period artifact, it does not appear to have been used in medieval armory.  The handle is to base by Society default.  For related charges, see drumstick.  See also zither.

Ivon of Darkforest bears:  Vert, three pairs of dulcimer hammers in saltire within a bordure embattled Or.

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