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Table

Table (with trestles) (Period)

Table (with trestles) (Period)

A table is a piece of furniture, consisting of a large flat surface supported at waist-height by legs or trestles.  The style does not seem to have been blazoned, in period or in the Society.

Trestle tables seem to be more commonly found in medieval armory.  A typical depiction would show the trestle in profile, as in the arms of Marschalgk von Ostheim, 1605 [Siebmacher 101].  But we also have period examples of the trestle table in trian view, in the arms of Faltzner, c.1600 [BSB Cod.Icon 307:547].  The illustration is based on Faltzner.

Table (with legs) (Period)

Table (with legs) (Period)

Tables with four straight legs are less commonly found, at least in heraldry, but we do have one example:  the arms of von Stüllingenn, early 16th C. [BSB Cod.Icon 392d:532].  This form of table should be drawn so that the legs may be distinguished, to aid in identification.

The Minister of the Lists of Atlantia bears:  Per pale argent and azure, a table sable between three quill pens one and two bendwise sinister counterchanged.

Dananir al-Attarah bears as a badge:  Atop a table sable a goblet gules.

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Table-trestle

Table-trestle (Period)

Table-trestle (Period)

Table-trestle (Period)

Table-trestle (Period)

A table-trestle is a braced support for the top of a table.  Two such trestles might be affixed to the ends of a horizontal beam for stability.  Several trestles might also be used to fashion a larger table for occasional use, such as banquets; the table was not a permanent furnishing in such a case.

The table-trestle is a period charge, found in two slightly different forms.  The form found in the arms of Awersberg or Auersberg, 1605 [Siebmacher 33] is a basic A-frame.  Often, the table-trestle’s woodwork was decoratively carved:  the illustration is taken from an example in the Luttrell Psalter, c.1340.

Another form of table-trestle, with three legs visible rather than two, is found in the arms of Stratford, 1480 [DBA3 442; also cf. Guillim1 213].  No difference is granted between the two forms.  Both forms are shown in profile by default.

Katherina Mornewegh bears:  Gules, a table-trestle Or.

Rodrigo de Burgos bears:  Gules, a table-trestle argent.

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Tablet, Mosaic

Mosaic tablets conjoined in fess (Accepted)

Mosaic tablets conjoined in fess (Accepted)

A Mosaic tablet is a flat slab or plaque, suitable for enscription or engraving.  Tradition makes this the form of the tablets on which Moses brought the Ten Commandments down from Sinai, hence the name.  Though found in period art, we have no examples of them from period armory.  In Society armory, Mosaic tablets are usually shown in conjoined pairs, though the fact is always blazoned.  See also book.

Collawyn Lughaidh O Cearbhaill bears:  Per fess argent and gules, in pale a lion contourny maintaining an Irish harp and two Mosaic tablets conjoined in fess counterchanged.

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Tablet, weaver’s

Square weaver's tablet (Accepted)

Square weaver’s tablet (Accepted)

A weaver’s tablet is a small card with holes, used to separate warp threads in a hand loom.  The Society’s default form is more fully blazoned a “square weaver’s tablet”, with four holes arranged two and two.  The artifact is ancient, with archaeological finds dating from at least the 9th Century [Peter Collingwood, The Techniques of Tablet Weaving, 1982, pp.14-16]; but it doesn’t appear to have been used in period armory.  For related charges, see delf, die.

Thora Sharptooth bears:  Gules, three square weaver’s tablets in bend Or.

Ciorstan MacAmhlaidh bears:  Quarterly sable and argent, a square weaver’s tablet lozengewise counterchanged.

Astrid Olafsdotter bears:  Vert, in cross four square weaver’s tablets bendwise argent.

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Tail

Lion's queue (Period); fox's tail couped, tip to base (Period)

Lion’s queue (Period); fox’s tail couped, tip to base (Period)

A tail is the caudal appendage of some beast, bird, or monster, used as a separate charge in its own right.  The type of creature must be specified in the blazon; period armory has examples of lion’s tails (in the arms of Pynchebek, c.1460 [RH]) and fox’s tails (the badge of Thomas of Woodstock, d.1397 [HB 104]).  Society armory has examples of dragon’s tails and yak’s tails, among others.  Tails are palewise and erased by default; while most tails (notably lions’ queues) have the severed end to base, other tails (such as the fox’s tail) must be explicitly blazoned.

The term “queue” refers specifically to a lion’s tail.  It may be “fourchy” (forked), or “nowed” (knotted), just as though attached to the lion.  The illustration shows a lion’s queue and a fox’s tail couped, tip to base.  See also ermine spot.

Shag Fevermore bears:  Pean, a lion’s tail queue-fourchy erect Or.

Victoria Fox bears:  Purpure, on a bend sinister argent between a pair of hands Or, three fox’s tails palewise, tips to base proper.

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Tankard

Tankard (Period)

Tankard (Period)

A tankard is a drinking vessel, roughly cylindrical in shape, with a handle.  It may also be called a “stein” or a “mug”.  It is considered baser than a cup, more suited for ale than for wine.  The tankard appears to be a period charge, seen in the arms of Juncker, early 16th C. [BSB Cod.Icon 392d:612].

The tankard is frequently shown with a flat lid pivoted on the rim, which can be flipped open with the thumb; this form may be blazoned a “covered tankard”.  While covered tankards are found as period artifacts (e.g., as used on the Mary Rose, c.1545 [Rule 201]), we have no examples of their use in period armory.

Jack (Accepted)

Jack (Accepted)

A similar charge in the Society, the “jack”, is noted for being made of leather, rather than metal or stoneware.  Its shape is more conical due to its material, but the jack is an artistic variant only; it carries no heraldic difference from the tankard.

All forms of tankard have their handles to sinister by Society default.  For related charges, see pitcher.

Daniel de Tankard bears:  Gules, a tankard of beer Or headed argent.

Morgan Conner bears:  Per pale sable and Or, two tankards, handles in the flanks, counterchanged.

Tadhg MacAodháin uí Chonchobhair bears as a badge:  On a jack reversed sable a harp between three compass stars one and two Or.

 

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Tarasque

Tarasque statant guardant (Accepted)

Tarasque statant guardant (Accepted)


The tarasque is an amphibious monster associated with Tarascon, France.  Legends of the tarasque date from the 12th Century, frequently as part of the legend of St. Martha.  It resembles a spiny-shelled tortoise with six legs; it’s often shown with a somewhat humanoid face.  The tarasque is used in the modern arms of Tarascon, but no period heraldic examples have been found.  The illustration shows a tarasque statant guardant.

Morgiane de Provence bears:  Azure, a four-legged tarasque statant gardant contourny argent.

Dawn Schadue bears as a badge:  A tarasque passant vert vorant of two human legs clothed azure.

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Tassel

Tassel (Period)

Tassel (Period)

A tassel is a bundle of threads, loose at the bottom and bound into a knob at the top.  Medieval tassels were used to ornament clothing and other items such as cushions.  However, the tassel was also used as an heraldic charge in its own right:  e.g., in the arms of de Novedrate, mid-15th C. [Triv 248], and of John or Johns, c.1520 [DBA2 401].  See also knot.

The Order of the Scarlet Guard, of Æthelmearc, bears:  A tassel per pale gules and argent.

Theodora Bryennissa bears:  Argent, a tassel and a chief engrailed azure, a bordure sable.

Adalyde de Sardaigne bears as a badge:  Gules, a tassel bendwise sinister Or.

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Teazel

Teazel slipped and leaved (Period)

Teazel slipped and leaved (Period)

The teazel, or teasel, is a spiny flower used in dressing or fulling cloth; it is sometimes more fully blazoned a “fuller’s teazel” for that reason.  It is a period charge, found in the arms of the Worshipful Company of Fullers, 1510 (later incorporated into the Clothworkers, 1530) [Bromley & Child 48].  Unlike most flowers, the teazel is shown in profile by default.

The teazel could either be blazoned “slipped and leaved”, as shown as in the illustration; or only the head might be shown, blazoned a “teazel’s cob” or “teazel’s head”.  For related charges, see thistle.

Liadan Chu bears:  Argent, three teasels slipped and leaved vert, between two flaunches purpure each charged with a triquetra fesswise one point outward Or.

Anne la Trouvere bears:  Vert, a teazel slipped and leaved and on a chief Or three lozenges azure.

Beatrix Elizabeth de Lara bears:  Quarterly azure and argent, in bend sinister a teazel head and a Catherine’s wheel sable within a bordure counterchanged.

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Tennis racquet

Tennis racquet (Accepted)

Tennis racquet (Accepted)

A tennis racquet, or racket, is used in the game of tennis to swat the ball across the court.  It consists of a round frame on a short handle, with a mesh stretched across the frame.  It is a period artifact:  the illustration is based on an example from 1583 [Gianni Clerici, The Ultimate Tennis Book: 500 years of the sport, fig.11].  Unremarkably, the tennis racquet doesn’t seem to have been used in period armory.  The handle is to base by Society default.

Bertrand du Beaumanoir bears:  Vert, two tennis rackets in saltire, a bordure embattled Or.

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