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Ibex

Ibex rampant (Period)

Ibex rampant (Period)

Natural ibex statant (Period)

Natural ibex statant (Period)

The ibex is a monster similar to the antelope, but with forward-sweeping horns; it’s also called an “ebeck” in some period grants [Woodcock & Robinson pl.9].  The ibex was found in period armory as the badge of Audley, Lord Audley, d.1544 [Siddons I pl. 8; Woodcock & Robinson pl.19], and as the crest of Carill or Carrell, 1588 [Gwynn-Jones 104].  There doesn’t seem to be a default posture for the ibex; the illustration shows an ibex rampant.

When blazoned a “natural ibex”, the term refers to a beast, a species of mountain goat with distinctive circular horns.  It too is found in period armory, most commonly in German armory, as in the arms of Windegg, c.1340 [Zurich 325]; the illustration shows a natural ibex statant.  Since the two creatures have little in common but the name, Society heraldry grants difference between the ibex and the natural ibex.

Mary Taran of Glastonbury bears as a badge:  An ibex rampant Or armed argent.

Cainder of Loch Suilli bears:  Per pale ermine and sable, two natural ibexes rampant addorsed counterchanged.

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Icicle

Icicle (Period)

Icicle (Period)

An icicle is a spike of ice, formed when water dripping from a roof freezes.  The charge is period, found in the arms of Herbotell or Harbottle, c.1295 [ANA2 477], but the name “icicle” may not be:  texts have suggested that they might be “hair bottles”, or possibly “gouts inverted”.  In any event, the charge seems confined to the arms of this family.  The icicle is palewise, point to base by default.

Carolina of Milan bears:  Argent semy of icicles, a daffodil plant vert with two blossoms, bells fesswise addorsed Or.

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Ink bottle

Inkbottle (Period)

Inkbottle (Period)

Ink pot (Accepted)

Ink pot (Accepted)

An ink bottle is a short, squat vessel for holding a writer’s ink; it’s also called an “ink flask”, “ink horn”, or “ink well”, though the shape remains unchanged.  It’s normally found as half of a penner and inkhorn, but we have at least one period example of its use as a separate charge:  the arms of Abbot, d.1487 [DBA2 314].

 

There is also the “ink pot”, more ornate and less portable than a standard ink bottle; though a period artifact, its use as a charge seems unique to Society heraldry.  See also bottle, flask.

 

The West Kingdom College of Scribes bears:  Sable, an ink flask Or.

The College of Boethius bears as a badge:  Or, on an open book azure, an ink pot Or.

Ingrid the Fair bears:  Or, three inkwells gules, on a chief azure a drakkar without sail argent.

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Insects

Butterfly (Period)

Butterfly (Period)

Spider (Period)

Spider (Period)

The term “insect”, as used here, refers to any “bug-type” creature:  true insects, arachnids, and other arthropods.  Examples found in period heraldry include the “ant”, also called an “emmet” for canting purposes [Guillim1 151]; the “beetle”, found in the arms of Teufel, 1605 [Siebmacher 42]; the “butterfly”, also called a “papillon”, found in the arms of Burnynghill, c.1410 [TJ 1447]; the “grasshopper”, in the arms of Woodward, c.1500 [DBA2 380]; the “spider” [Guillim1 151]; the “stag beetle”, whose pincers are drawn as actual stag’s attires, in the crest of Hartwell, early 16th C. [Bedingfeld 104]; and the “fly”, sometimes specified as a “gad-fly”, “house-fly”, or “horse-fly”, in the arms of da Varexio, mid-15th C. [Triv 364].

Scarab (Accepted)

Scarab (Accepted)

Dragonfly (Accepted)

Dragonfly (Accepted)

In Society armory, we have examples of the “cockroach”; the “dragonfly”; the “ladybug”; the “moth”; the “praying mantis”; and the “scarab”, usually stylized as in ancient Egyptian art.  Smaller insects, such as the flea, have been deemed unsuitable for Society use.

All winged insects are volant en arrière by default; this posture may also be blazoned simply “volant”, and in the Society is sometimes misblazoned “displayed” as well.  Unwinged insects are in general tergiant by default, with heads to chief; the exceptions are the grasshopper, which is statant, and the praying mantis, which must be explicitly blazoned.  Their posture is sometimes qualified by such terms as “extended”, “displayed”, &c; such qualifiers are usually superfluous.

Permissible insect postures other than the defaults are limited.  As of this writing, insects may not be rampant, but may be statant.  Winged insects may not be rising; when winged insects are statant, Society convention has their wings addorsed.  Those insects tergiant by default may be tergiant inverted, if their identifiability is not compromised, but this is usually considered a step from period practice.

Generally, insects do not have “proper” tinctures, but Society armory has a few cases.  The “butterfly proper” is tinctured as found in nature; the breed of butterfly must then be specified.  The “ladybug proper” is gules, spotted sable (with the legs and head usually sable as well).

The illustrations show a butterfly, a spider, a scarab, and a dragonfly; all are in their default postures.  For specific entries, see bee, scorpion.

Liùsadh ni Nheill bears:  Purpure, two papillons in pale Or.

Daria Joan de Courtenay bears:  Argent, a praying mantis rising, wings addorsed vert.

Adrianna de la Telaraña bears:  Per pale sable and Or, a spider tergiant counterchanged.

Daffyd of Emmett bears:  Gyronny of twelve gules and Or, an emmet sable.

Andrew of Seldom Rest bears:  Or, a dragonfly displayed gules.

Laurent le Noir bears:  Pean, a winged scarab within a bordure Or.

Tyr of Mordenvale bears:  Azure, on a bend sinister cotised Or a stag beetle sable.

Johannes Gotzmann bears:  Argent, a grasshopper contourny, a bordure vert.

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Iris

Iris slipped and leaved (Accepted)

Iris slipped and leaved (Accepted)

The iris is a flower with sword-shaped leaves and drooping petals.  In heraldry texts [e.g., Woodward 333], it’s mentioned alongside the lily; but while the lily is often found in period heraldry, no examples have been found of the iris, so blazoned.  As a consequence, the iris has no stylized heraldic form; Society examples are usually depicted as found in nature.  The illustration shows an iris slipped and leaved.  See also tulip.

Keridwen of Montrose bears:  Per chevron counter-ermine and argent, in base an iris azure, slipped and leaved vert.

Rachel Ashton bears:  Or, three irises one and two purpure, cupped vert.

Sionett Roberts bears:  Vert, three irises one and two Or.

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