Cross: Celtic

Celtic cross (Accepted)

Celtic cross (Accepted)

Equal-armed Celtic cross (Accepted)

Equal-armed Celtic cross (Accepted)

The “Celtic cross” is found in Irish stone sculptures, dating from the 5th Century; it is characterized by an annulet conjoined to the limbs.  A similar motif (unblazoned) is found in the arms of Cardinal St. Marie, 1413 [Conz.Const. lxxi].  The Latinate form of Celtic cross, with the elongated lower limb, is the most common; the “equal-armed” form, with its ends potent, should be explicitly blazoned.  These two forms are considered artistic variants; the heraldic difference is negligible.  Celtic crosses made by adding an annulet to another type of cross (e.g., a “Celtic cross moline”) are considered a step from period practice.  Modern depictions of the Celtic cross, where the annulet and cross are thin lines of equal width (like a gunsight) are not permitted.

Siobhan an Lochllanach bears:  Sable, a Celtic cross argent atop a mount Or.

Etain ingen Ghilla Phatraic bears:  Or, a Celtic cross per pale purpure and vert.

Morgana Swansdottir bears:  Or, a Celtic cross equal armed, quarterly pierced and throughout vert.

Seamus Albanach Mac Roibeirt bears:  Bendy sinister sable and argent, an equal-armed Celtic cross gules.

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