Gurges

Gurges (ancient) (Period)

Gurges (ancient) (Period)

Gurges (Tudor) (Period)

Gurges (Tudor) (Period)

A gurges is the heraldic representation of a whirlpool, by which name it is sometimes blazoned.  It is found in the canting arms of Gorges, c.1255 [Asp2 152].  In its original form, the gurges was drawn as a series of concentric annulets, typically around four in number; with the outer rings often intersecting the edges of the shield.  At the end of our period, possibly as a result of misdrawing, it began to be drawn as a spiraling line from the center to the edge of the shield; this is the form found in most modern heraldry texts.  (The illustrations both show a dark gurges on a white field.)  The forms are considered interchangeable, and both are permitted in Society armory.

Despite some early Society misblazons, the gurges is a charge.  For related charges, see schnecke.

Damian d’Outremer bears:  Sable, a gurges Or.

Gregory of Glencairn bears:  Vert, a cross engrailed argent, overall a gurges Or.

Geoffrey de Rennes bears as a badge:  Or, a whirlpool rayonny vert.

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