Gauntlet; Glove

Gauntlet (Period)

Gauntlet (Period)

A gauntlet is a piece of armor for the hand.  It is a period charge, found in the arms of de Wauncy, c.1312 [ANA2 470].  The gauntlet may be of mail or plate, depending on the period and the artist’s discretion; it was frequently depicted without separated fingers (so-called “clamshell” gauntlets).  In the Society, the default gauntlet is the dexter gauntlet, and its default posture is apaumy.  Other postures are also found, though sometimes blazoned as, e.g., “a mailed fist” instead of “a gauntlet clenched”.

 

 

 

Glove (Period)

Glove (Period)

Mitten (Period)

Mitten (Period)

Similar to the gauntlet is the “glove”:  like the gauntlet, a covering for the hand, but an article of clothing instead of armor, made of leather or cloth instead of metal.  It’s found in the canting arms (German Handschuh) of Handschuhsheim, c.1450 [Ingeram 268]. The glove follows the conventions and defaults of the gauntlet (indeed, one branch of the Wauncy family bears gloves), which are those of hands.  In fact, both gauntlets and gloves are often assumed to have a hand inside them.

Finally, there is the “mitten”, a knitted (or nailbound) fingerless glove.  The mitten is a period charge, used in the crest of von Lens, c.1370 [Gelre 82], and in the arms of Folderer, mid-16th C. [NW 55].  It follows the same conventions and defaults as gloves and gauntlets.

Murdoch of Muirhead bears:  Gules, in bend three clenched gauntlets Or.

Lisette la fauconniere d’Amboise bears:  Plumetty Or and sable, a sinister glove fesswise reversed gules.

Sigrid Bríánsdotter bears as a badge:  A sinister mitten vert.

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