Fence

Weir (Period)

Weir (Period)

Park pales (Accepted)

Park pales (Accepted)

A fence is an enclosure around a field or piece of land, less massive or permanent than a wall, and usually made of wood or similar material.  In period armory, the typical form was a wattle fence, drawn as wicker branches woven around posts; this form is found in the arms of Stapfer, 1605 [Siebmacher 199].  The wattle fence is also blazoned a “weir” or “yair”, which in period was submerged in streams and used to trap fish; it’s found in the canting arms of Zare, 1542 [Lindsay].

In Society armory, there’s one example of a fence made from “park pales”:  closely set pointed stakes, modernly called a picket fence.  The illustration is taken from Parker [442], who cites the use of park pales in several armories; but none have been dated to period.  See also edifice.

George Warde bears:  Vert, a weir Or.

Edelgard Erzsébet von Württemberg bears as a badge:  Between the peaks of a mountain of two peaks argent issuant from park pales gules a hurst of trees proper.

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