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Wheelbarrow

Wheelbarrow (Accepted)

Wheelbarrow (Accepted)

A wheelbarrow is a small handcart, with one or two wheels at one end and a pair of handles at the other, used for lifting and carrying loads (typically dirt, building materials, &c).  It’s a period artifact: the illustration is taken from Agricola’s De Re Metallica, 1556. However, no period examples of its use in heraldry are known.  The wheelbarrow is fesswise, with its wheel to dexter, by Society default.  For related charges, see wagon.

Hannes zum Eichhorn bears:  Per fess vert and Or, a wheelbarrow and an acorn counterchanged.

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Whip

Scourge or whip of three lashes (Period)

Scourge or whip of three lashes (Period)

A whip is an instrument for delivering a stinging blow, with one or more lashes set in a handle.  The single-lash whip is used to drive animals.  When blazoned a “scourge”, it has multiple lashes and is intended to be an emblem of martyrdom; it’s found in the arms of Eybeswaldt, 1605 [Siebmacher 37].  When drawn with distinct lashes (as in the illustration), it has three by default; it can also be drawn with more, as in the “cat-o’-nine-tails”, though the fact must be blazoned.  Whips and scourges have their handles to base by default.

Deadra Colin Madoc bears:  Argent, a drover’s whip bendwise sinister, lash in action sable.

Valgard Stonecleaver bears as a badge: Or, a scourge sable.

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Whirligig

Whirligig (Accepted)

Whirligig (Accepted)

A whirligig is a child’s toy, consisting of a staff with a pivoted vaned crosspiece, which is spun in the wind.  It is also termed a “scopperel”, or more modernly, a “pinwheel”.  No examples of the whirligig have yet been found in period armory; however, as a period artifact, it is accepted for use in the Society.  The illustration is taken from the breviary of Eleanor of Portugal, c.1500 [in the Morgan Library].  See also windmill.

The Order of the Whirligig, of the Barony of Delftwood, bears:  Azure, a whirligig argent.

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Whistle, mariner’s

Mariner's whistle (Period)

Mariner’s whistle (Period)

A mariner’s whistle is a thin metal tube extending from a hollow ball:  it was used to command sailors’ attention at sea.  It’s a period charge, used as a badge by de Vere, Earl of Oxford, who had been Lord of the Admiralty, d.1513 [Coat of Arms IV(27), July 56, p.96; also Siddons II.2 303].  Post-period heraldic authors misinterpreted the badge as a wine bottle, but more recent research has corrected this.  The mariner’s whistle is fesswise by default.  See also musical instruments.

William Fletcher of Carbery bears:  Per bend azure and gules, a bend Or between three arrows in pale fesswise reversed and a mariner’s whistle palewise argent.

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Wind

Wind, or aeolus (Period)

Wind, or aeolus (Period)

Winds are masses of air in natural motion.  Invisible in nature, they’re depicted in art as a human heads issuant from cloud, usually shown visibly blowing air from their mouths.  Frequently depicted in period art (e.g., on maps), we know of a single example in period armory, in the canting arms of de Zeffiro, c.1550 [BSB Cod.Icon 268:233].

In Society blazon, the generic wind may also be called an “aeolus”.  Other types of wind include the “boreas”, an icy-bearded old man; the “zephyr”, an androgynous youth; and the female “mistral”.  Winds face dexter by default, and should be shown in profile (though some are affronty); they should never be in trian aspect.  For related charges, see head (human).

The Canton of Elvegast bears:  Per chevron azure and vert, in chief two aeoli with breaths conjoined at fess point argent, in base a laurel wreath Or.

Mistral de L’Isle sur Tarn bears:  Per fess wavy vert and azure, issuant from chief a mistral and from base four piles wavy inverted conjoined at the fess point argent.

Cassandra de la Mistral bears:  Azure, a boreas affronty argent.

Æsa Þorarinsdottir bears:  Azure, a zephyr argent and a bordure rayonny Or.

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Windmill

Windmill (Period)

Windmill (Period)

A windmill is an edifice for drawing power from the wind, consisting of a roofed tower supporting four sails on a central axis.  The sails are set saltirewise by Society default.

The windmill was used in the rebus badge of Kingsmill, 1557 [Siddons II.2 336].  A pair of windmill’s sails alone were also used, in the arms of Newmarche, c.1460 [RH], and as the badge of Willoughby, 1449 [HB 157].  See also whirligig.

The Baron of Delftwood bears:  Quarterly azure and argent, a windmill, sails crosswise, and in sinister chief a laurel wreath counterchanged.

Alis of Tuscon bears:  Quarterly azure and argent, a windmill gules, vanes throughout and set saltirewise Or.

Marcos de Valencia bears:  Or, three windmills purpure.

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Wing

Wing (Period)

Wing (Period)

Wings are those limbs of a flying creature that provide the lifting force.  Those of birds are feathered, those of bats membranous; the feathered wing is the default type, to be used unless otherwise specified.  All wings are displayed by default.
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A wing may be used as a single charge; this usage dates from c.1295, in the English arms of Peek [ANA2 556].  Both dexter wings and sinister wings are found in period armory.  The mundane default has varied between countries and times; the Society default is the dexter wing. 
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Wing terminating in a hand, sustaining a sword fesswise reversed (Period)

Wing terminating in a hand, sustaining a sword fesswise reversed (Period)

Issuant from a sinister wing, a hand maintaining a sword (Period)

Issuant from a sinister wing, a hand maintaining a sword (Period)

In German heraldry, the single wing may “terminate in a hand” (often maintaining a sword, as in the illustration), with the hand opposite the wing’s severed end; it’s found in the arms of the Dukes of Calabria, 1413 [Conz.Const. xcviii].  This is distinguished in blazon from a hand or claw “issuant from a wing”, where the hand issues from the wing’s severed end; it’s found in the arms of the Marquis de Vilena, c.1370 [Gelre 62v].  (There is also an example of a wing terminating in an eagle’s head, in the arms of von Ernberg, 1605 [Siebmacher 103].)  These variations are always blazoned.
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Vol, or pair of wings conjoined (Period)

Vol, or pair of wings conjoined (Period)

Pair of wings conjoined in lure (Period)

Pair of wings conjoined in lure (Period)

Wings are also found in pairs, with a dexter and a sinister wing, frequently conjoined.  (The difference is subtly blazoned:  two separate, dexter wings would be blazoned “two wings”, while a dexter wing and a sinister wing would be “a pair of wings”.)  This usage dates from c.1285, in the arms of Derneford [ANA2 555].

A pair of wings may be conjoined: this was considered artist’s license, as the same arms could be drawn either with the wings conjoined or separate. A pair of wings displayed and conjoined may also be blazoned a “vol”, the French term for the motif; this is seen in the arms of von Hohenfels, 1606 [Siebmacher 140]. If the conjoined wings are displayed with tips inverted, they are known as “wings conjoined in lure”, as in the arms of Jane Seymour, d.1537 [Woodcock & Robinson pl.19].

Finally, of Society-unique charges, we find the “set of seraph’s wings”:  six wings conjoined, arranged as if attached to a seraph.

Bat’s wings are much less common in medieval armory than bird’s wings:  Your Author knows but a single example, the badge of Daubeney, Earl of Bridgewater, d.1548 [HB 81].  For related charges, see lure.

The Baron of the Angels bears as a badge:  A set of seraph’s wings Or.

The College of Cathanar bears:  Vert, a sinister hawk’s wing argent and in canton a laurel wreath Or.

Matill of Windkeep bears:  Purpure, three sinister wings argent.

Brioc Morcannuc bears:  Azure, a vol Or.

Herman Mandel bears:  Barry and per pale sable and Or, a wing terminating in a hand maintaining a sword all within a bordure gules.

Etienne Michel de Calais bears:  Argent, in pale three pairs of bat-wings conjoined gules.

Gustavus von Goslar bears:  Or, an eagle’s dexter wing terminating in an eagle’s head sinister facing sable, a chief rayonny gules.

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Winged charges

Winged tower (Period)

Winged tower (Period)

Occasionally, inanimate charges may be shown with a pair of wings attached.  Period examples include the winged column in the arms of von Oberndorff, c.1560 [BSB Cod.Icon 390:772]; the winged mount of six hillocks, in the arms of Lugarini, c.1550 [BSB Cod.Icon 278:423]; and the winged arrow in the arms of Zinngall or Zingel, c.1600 [BSB Cod.Icon 307:536].  By default, the wings will be eagle’s wings displayed, of comparable size to the charge.  The wings are attached to the charge on its dexter and sinister sides; the exception seems to be for winged shoes, feet, &c, where the wings are addorsed and attached near the heel.  The illustration shows a winged tower, as in the arms of Baldovini, c.1550 [BSB Cod.Icon 274:339].  See also winged monsters.

Uther vom Schwartzwald bears:  Sable, a winged chalice Or.

Denys Calais bears:  Gules, a key Or winged argent.

Bronwyn Schutelisworth bears:  Or, a weaver’s shuttle palewise vert winged sable.

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Winged monsters

Lion of St. Mark statant guardant (Period)

Lion of St. Mark statant guardant (Period)

Winged stag segreant (Accepted)

Winged stag segreant (Accepted)

This class of monster consists of beasts with wings grafted to their shoulders.  Almost any beast may be so treated, such as the winged fox in the arms of Fuchs, mid-16th C [NW 37], or even the winged fish in the arms of von Bruecdorp or Brockdorf, c.1370 [Gelre 33v].  Even other monsters, if normally wingless, may have wings added.  The wings are eagle’s wings by default; other types of wings, such as bat’s wings, are also found in Society armory, but are unattested in period armory.  Such cases must be explicitly blazoned.  (This doesn’t apply to those monsters whose definitions include wings, such as the dragon.)

There are special terms for some winged monsters.  A haloed winged lion may be blazoned a “lion of St. Mark”; it is found in the civic arms of Venice, 1413 [Conz.Const. cciii].  (St. Mark was the patron saint of the city.)  A haloed winged ox may be blazoned an “ox of St. Luke”; it is found in the arms of Caravello, 1413 [Conz.Const. cliii].  Both evangelists’ monsters are frequently shown maintaining a book, that being their attribute, but such cases are nonetheless explicitly blazoned.

Bat-winged boar courant (Accepted)

Bat-winged boar courant (Accepted)

Winged dolphin naiant (Accepted)

Winged dolphin naiant (Accepted)

Rampant winged monsters may be blazoned “segreant”, since that term may be applied to any monster “half-bird, half-beast”; in that case, the posture of the wings is defined by the term.  Winged monsters statant or couchant do not need their wings’ posture blazoned, either:  the wings will be addorsed by default, that being their most distinguishable posture.  The term “volant”, however, is ill-defined for non-birds, and should not be used for winged monsters; instead, the posture of the body should be blazoned in a standard way, with the wings’ position made explicit (e.g., a “winged lion courant, wings elevated and addorsed”).

The illustrations show a lion of St. Mark statant guardant; a winged stag segreant; a bat-winged boar courant, wings elevated and addorsed; and a winged dolphin, wings addorsed.  For specific entries, see humanoid monster (angel), pegasus, pithon.  See also winged charges.

Jon de Cles bears:  Gules, a winged camel trippant argent.

Jean Pierre de Sabre bears:  Or, a winged fish volant sable.

Harold von Auerbach bears:  Vert, a bat-winged boar salient argent.

Hastini Chandra bears:  Or, an Indian elephant passant gules, winged sable.

Jamie MacRae bears:  Purpure, a winged stag rampant to sinister argent.

Niall Kilkierny bears:  Vert, a winged sea-lion rampant Or.

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Wolf

Wolf rampant (Period)

Wolf rampant (Period)

The wolf is a predatory canine beast, whose medieval reputation was one of rapacity and strength.  It was a common charge in medieval armory, called a “leu” or “loup” in early blazons, and found as early as c.1275 in the canting arms of Lou [ANA2 109].  The wolf does not seem to have a default posture; the illustration shows a wolf rampant.

A “wolf ululant” has its head raised, howling or baying.  The term is unique to Society heraldry; the motif is considered a step from period practice.  For related charges, see dog, fox, hyena, werewolf.

The Prince of Oertha bears:  Azure, a wolf sejant, head erect, in chief two compass stars and on a base argent a laurel wreath azure.

Conall Mac Earnáin bears:  Argent, three wolves rampant sable.

Philip Dyemoke bears:  Potent, a wolf rampant sable.

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