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Glove-puppet

Glove-puppet (Period)

Glove-puppet (Period)

A glove-puppet is a doll attached to a simplified glove, worn over the hand and used in amusements.  It is a period charge, found in German heraldry c.1400 [Neubecker 122].  For related charges, see gauntlet, human figure.

Linnet Kestrel bears:  Or, a glove-puppet displayed affronty erased of a man vested of chain, helm and surcoat azure, atop the dexter arm a hen linnet close to sinister and atop the sinister arm a cock kestrel close proper.

Ismay of Giggleswick bears as a badge:  A glove-puppet vested vair, faced argent, collared and wearing a jester’s cap gules.

This entry was posted on January 30, 2014, in .

Goad

Elephant goad (Accepted); goad (Accepted)

Elephant goad (probable SFPP); goad (Accepted)

A goad is a sharp pointed stick, used for driving large beasts such as elephants or oxen.  There are two types of goad found in Society heraldry; the better documented form, the elephant goad (the dexter charge in the illustration), is an Indian artifact, being a traditional attribute of the god Ganesha.  The Society default for both types of goad is palewise, point to chief.

Katherine Goodwyn bears:  Argent, a goad fesswise sable entwined of a grapevine fructed proper, between two bars vert between in pale two Catherine wheels sable.

Hastini Chandra bears as a badge:  An elephant goad.

This entry was posted on January 30, 2014, in .

Goat

Goat clymant (Period)

Goat clymant (Period)

The goat is a horned, hooved beast famed for its lasciviousness (and, strangely enough, its eyesight).  The most common depiction is long-horned and bearded, with longer hair at the throat.  It’s a common charge, found as early as c.1320, in the arms of Obaerloh or Obaerlon [Zurich 366].

Special terms applied to goats include “clymant”, meaning rampant.  The goat doesn’t seem to have any default posture; the illustration shows a goat clymant.  For related charges, see ibex (natural), musimon, sheep.

Kozima la Pellegrina bears:  Sable, a goat clymant to sinister Or.

Eoghan MacCionna BaileArd bears:  Or, a brown goat erect playing a bagpipe proper, bagged gules.

Ottokar von Ehrenfels bears:  Argent, a goat clymant azure.

This entry was posted on January 30, 2014, in .

Golf club

Golf club (Accepted)

Golf club (Accepted)

A golf club is a tool used in the game of golf, promoted by the Scots as their revenge on the rest of the world.  The club consists of a staff with a flat striking head, used to hit a small, defenseless ball.  It’s a period artifact, depicted in a Flemish book of hours (the so-called “Golf Book” by Simon Bening) c.1540; but unsurprisingly, it’s not found in period heraldry.

The golf club has its handle to chief by Society default.

Torquil MacTaggart the Steadfast bears:  Vert, two golf clubs crossed in saltire, on a chief rayonny argent three pellets.

Murdoc MacKinnon bears:  Vert, on a bend embattled counter-embattled between two golf clubs inverted in saltire and an Irish harp Or, a greatsword sable.

This entry was posted on January 30, 2014, in .

Goose

Goose (Period)

Goose (Period)

The goose is a water bird, noted for its foolishness and credulity; oddly, it was also a symbol of vigilance, due to the legend of the Capitoline geese saving Rome.  It’s a period charge, found in the canting coats of Barnak (“barnacle geese”) c.1410 [TJ 1312] and of von Ganse (German Gans), 1605 [Siebmacher 182].

The goose is close by default, as in the illustration.  When blazoned “enraged”, its wings are elevated and addorsed, its head is extended for a hiss:  functionally equivalent to rising.

The “duck”, a smaller relative of the goose, is also found in period armory:  the canting arms (Italian anatra) of di Anedre, mid-15th C. [Triv 50].  It shares the same defaults as the goose.  For related charges, see swan.

The Baron of An Dubhaigeainn bears:  Azure, a duck naiant to sinister argent, billed, within a laurel wreath Or.

Mathilde Meyer bears:  Per pale azure and argent, two geese respectant enraged counterchanged.

Emma of Wolvercote bears:  Argent, three geese naiant azure.

This entry was posted on January 30, 2014, in .

Gore; Gusset

Gore (Period)

Gore (Period)

Gusset (Period)

Gusset (Period)

A gore is considered an heraldic sub-ordinary by some texts, and a rebatement of honor by others; it seems to be an invention of heraldic writers.  Certainly, no instance of its actual use in period armory has yet been documented – but as it was described in period tracts (e.g., Legh’s Accidence of Armory, 1562 [72v]), the gore has been accepted for use in Society heraldry.

The gore may issue from either the dexter or the sinister side of the shield; the default gore issues from dexter.  Society armory has examples where both gores are used; this has been deemed a step from period practice.

The “gusset” is an artistic variant of the gore, which is drawn with straight lines instead of curved lines.  Actual instances of its use have been documented in Scots heraldry, in the arms of Cunningham, 1610 [Guillim1 35]; however, unlike the gore, gussets were found in pairs.

Charged gores and gussets had at one time been registered in Society armory, but the results were usually unbalanced; at the present, neither the gore nor the gusset may be charged in Society armory.  The use of other charges on the field alongside a gore or gusset is a step from period practice.  See also ordinary.

Regulus of Vinhold bears:  Or, two gores sable.

Thora Arnketilsdottír bears:  Sable, a gore sinister vair.

Sarah of the Crystal Water bears:  Argent, two gussets nebuly inverted azure, each charged with a gout argent.

This entry was posted on January 30, 2014, in .

Gout

Two gouts (Period and less so)

Two gouts (Period and less so)

A gout, or goutte, is a drop of fluid.  The illustration shows a medieval depiction, with wavy sides, and a more modern depiction, which tends to be smooth and fat.  The former is the preferred form.  Other depictions, which show the gout fatter than it is tall, or comma-shaped, are not allowed.

A field or charge semy of gouts may be blazoned “goutty” or “goutté”.  (The need for the distinguishing accent makes the French spelling inadvisable.)  Originally, gouts were always found semy; examples both of goutty fields and of goutty charges date to 1282, such as the arms of Bulmer [ANA2 69].  It was only later in period that gouts began to be used as distinct, single charges, as in the canting arms of Drop, c.1460 [RH].

Post-period heraldry evolved special names for gouts of each tincture; these may be used in Society blazons, at the user’s discretion:

A “gout d’Or” (drop of gold) is Or.  A “gout de sang” (drop of blood) is gules.  A “gout d’eau” (drop of water) is argent.  A “gout de larmes” (drop of tears) is azure.  A “gout de poix” (drop of pitch) is sable.  A “gout d’huile” (drop of olive oil) is vert.  A “gout de vin” (drop of wine) is purpure.

The Chirurgeonate bears:  Gules, on a goutte argent a fleam gules.

Gwendolyn Silvermist bears:  Per pale wavy azure goutty d’eau and argent goutty de larmes.

Wilfried Rudiger Quellenmann bears:  Barry wavy vert and argent, three gouttes de sang.

This entry was posted on January 30, 2014, in .

Grain

Ear of wheat (Period)

Ear of wheat (Period)

Grain is cereal grass that has been cultivated for food.  In period armory, grain is normally depicted as a single ear, with a bit of stalk couped; this is blazoned simply as an “ear of [grain]”, with the type of grain specified.  Many types of grain are found in period heraldry:  ears of wheat are found in the canting arms (Portuguese trigo) of Triguieros, c.1540 [Nobreza xxxviº], ears of barley in the canting arms (French orge) of Orgemont, c.1460 [GATD 54v], and ears of rye in the canting arms of Riddell of That Ilk, mid-16th C. [Lord Crawford’s Armorial, fo.141v].  Ears of grain are palewise by default; the illustration shows an ear of wheat.

We also have rare examples of “stalks of [grain]”, showing the full stalk and leaves topped by the ear.  Thus, while the arms of Triguieros use ears of wheat, the crest shows stalks of wheat.  Like the ears, stalks are palewise by default.

For related charges, see garb.  See also fruit.

Antonio de Gregorio bears:  Vert, a stalk of wheat inverted surmounted by two stalks of wheat in saltire Or.

Felene of Scotia bears:  Gyronny Or and vert, on the gyrons eight ears of wheat conjoined at the centerpoint counterchanged.

Edric Longfellow bears:  Per pale gules and azure, two stalks of barley in saltire within a bordure Or.

This entry was posted on January 31, 2014, in .

Grapes

Bunch of grapes (Period)

Bunch of grapes slipped and leaved (Period)

Grapes are small round fruit that grow on vines, and which are famously the basis for making wine.  Grapes grow, and therefore in heraldry are always depicted, in “bunches” or “clusters”.  Grapes are period charges, found in the arms of Zoller, 1605 [Siebmacher 199].  By default, a bunch of grapes has its slip to chief.  A “bunch of grapes proper” has purpure grapes, slipped and/or leaved vert [Parker 602].

Robert of Canterbury bears:  Gules, three bunches of grapes slipped and leaved Or.

Andrew of the Vine bears:  Or, three bunches of grapes sable, stemmed and leaved vert.

Inga Agnadottir bears:  Purpure, a bunch of grapes Or slipped and leaved argent.

This entry was posted on January 31, 2014, in .

Grappling iron

Grappling iron (Period)

Grappling iron (Period)

A grappling iron is a metal hook, tied to a line and thrown at enemy ships so they may be pulled closer.  It is also called a “grappling hook” or “grapnel”.  It’s a period charge, found in the arms of Stewyne, mid-16th C. [Bedingfeld 58].  The grappling iron is drawn with three or four flukes; it is palewise, flukes to base by default, though when held in a hand, the iron’s flukes are to chief.  For related charges, see anchor.

Hernando Herodes Montenegro de Mondragon bears as a badge:  In pale two grappling irons of four hooks, conjoined at the ring sable.

This entry was posted on January 31, 2014, in .