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Yale

Bedford yale rampant (Period)

Bedford yale rampant (Period)

Beaufort yale rampant (Period)

Beaufort yale rampant (Period)

The yale is an heraldic monster characterized by two long, mobile horns, which could be swivelled independently and at will; it also has a set of fierce tusks.  The yale doesn’t seem to have a default posture; the illustrations show yales rampant.

Two forms of yale are found in period heraldry [Dennys 165].  The earlier form, the “Bedford yale”, was one of the Duke of Bedford’s supporters c.1435, and resembles an antelope.  The other form, the “Beaufort yale”, was used by his grandson Sir John Beaufort, c.1450; it is stockier, more like a goat, and is usually strewn with roundels.  However, both yales have the characteristic horns and tusks; either type may be used in Society heraldry (and specified in blazon, if the submitter insists), but no difference is granted between them.

Jacinth Aldith de Warwick bears:  Argent, a yale rampant sable, armed and attired Or, within a bordure compony erminois and vert.

Styrkárr Bjarnarson bears:  Or, a yale rampant guardant vert bezanty armed gules.

Tristan le Chantecler de Champaigne bears:  Barry azure and argent, two yales combatant Or.

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Yarn

Clew of yarn (Period)

Clew of yarn (Period)

Hank of yarn (Period)

Hank of yarn (Period)

Yarn is a continuous length of fibers, spun or twisted, and used in the production of textiles.  It’s usually found as an adjunct to a spinner’s or seamstress’s tool:  e.g., a drop-spindle, niddy-noddy, quill of yarn, or shuttle.  However, when collected into a visible mass, yarn can be a charge in its own right.  One form is the simple “ball of yarn”, which Society heralds sometimes call a “clew of yarn” for the sake of a cant; the charge is found in the canting arms (Portuguese novelo) of Navaes or Novais, c.1540 [Nobreza xxviii].  Society practice grants no difference between a ball of yarn and a roundel.

There is also the “hank of yarn (or cotton)”, a skein of yarn wound and bound, as in the canting arms of Cotton, 1335 [DBA2 381; Parker 306].  The hank of yarn is palewise by default.  See also knot.

Elena Carlisle bears:  Per pall inverted Or, azure and argent, two domestic cats sejant guardant respectant counterchanged sable and argent and a ball of yarn azure.

Angharad Bach bears as a badge:  Azure, three clews of yarn quarterly Or and argent.

Isabel Moundoghter bears as a badge:  A clew of yarn pendant from a hank of cotton fesswise argent.

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Yoke

Yoke, British style (Period)

Yoke, British style (Period)

Yoke, German style (Period)

Yoke, German style (Period)

A yoke is the piece of harness equipment that connects two draft animals side-by-side; it’s sometimes more fully blazoned an “ox yoke”.  It’s a period charge, found in two somewhat different forms:  a Continental form, seen in the arms of von Mengersreuth, c.1370 [Gelre 44v; also Siebmacher 89]; and a British form, which was the badge of the Earls of Errol from at least the mid-16th Century [HB 99; also the Dunvegan Armorial, 1582, f.31].

The yoke is fesswise by default.  The British form, when “proper”, is colored brown, as with all wooden charges.

The Shire of Belle Rive bears as a badge:  An ox yoke, beamed vert, bowed argent.

Henricus Guotman bears:  Per fess wavy vert and purpure, in chief an ox yoke Or.

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Ypotryll

Ypotryll passant (Period)

Ypotryll passant (Period)

The ypotryll, or hippotryll, is an heraldic monster of awesome ugliness, with a camel’s humps, a boar’s face, and cloven hooves.  It was used as a badge by Tiptoft, Earl of Worcester c.1460 [Dennys 166].  The ypotryll does not seem to have a default posture; the illustration shows an ypotryll passant.

The Canton of Attilium bears as a badge:  An ypotryll passant Or.

Edelgard Erzsébet von Württemberg bears:  Purpure, an ypotryll dormant Or.

Nina of Bright Hills bears:  Or, a pale azure and overall an ypotryll rampant gules.

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