Search Results for: bottle

Ink bottle

Inkbottle (Period)

Inkbottle (Period)

Ink pot (Accepted)

Ink pot (Accepted)

An ink bottle is a short, squat vessel for holding a writer’s ink; it’s also called an “ink flask”, “ink horn”, or “ink well”, though the shape remains unchanged.  It’s normally found as half of a penner and inkhorn, but we have at least one period example of its use as a separate charge:  the arms of Abbot, d.1487 [DBA2 314].

 

There is also the “ink pot”, more ornate and less portable than a standard ink bottle; though a period artifact, its use as a charge seems unique to Society heraldry.  See also bottle, flask.

 

The West Kingdom College of Scribes bears:  Sable, an ink flask Or.

The College of Boethius bears as a badge:  Or, on an open book azure, an ink pot Or.

Ingrid the Fair bears:  Or, three inkwells gules, on a chief azure a drakkar without sail argent.

This entry was posted on February 12, 2014, in .

Bottle

Two bottles (Period; Accepted)

Two bottles (Period; Accepted)

A bottle is a small vessel, usually of glass or ceramic, with a narrow neck and mouth.  There were a wide variety of shapes used in period, but few found their way to heraldry; any period shape of bottle may be used in Society armory.  The illustration shows two typical examples; the one on the left is taken from the allusive arms (Italian muscia, a pint measure of wine) of de Muschiaro, mid-15th C. [Triv 223], where the allusion makes clear that it’s a wine bottle.

The bottle should never be drawn as though transparent, through the use of voiding or chasing; it should be solidly tinctured.  The bottle has its mouth to chief by default.  For related charges, see amphora, flask.  See also whistle (mariner’s).

John Linsdell of Tresco bears:  Or, a bottle bendwise inverted azure distilling a goutte, a base gules.

Lorenz Wieland bears:  Azure, a winged bottle bendwise sinister between in pall three eating forks tines to center argent.

This entry was posted on December 2, 2013, in .

Whistle, mariner’s

Mariner's whistle (Period)

Mariner’s whistle (Period)

A mariner’s whistle is a thin metal tube extending from a hollow ball:  it was used to command sailors’ attention at sea.  It’s a period charge, used as a badge by de Vere, Earl of Oxford, who had been Lord of the Admiralty, d.1513 [Coat of Arms IV(27), July 56, p.96; also Siddons II.2 303].  Post-period heraldic authors misinterpreted the badge as a wine bottle, but more recent research has corrected this.  The mariner’s whistle is fesswise by default.  See also musical instruments.

William Fletcher of Carbery bears:  Per bend azure and gules, a bend Or between three arrows in pale fesswise reversed and a mariner’s whistle palewise argent.

This entry was posted on June 8, 2014, in .

Vessels

Vessels are hollow containers for holding easily spilled contents.  They come in a wide variety of shapes, depending on their intended purpose; they may be made of metal, wood, horn, ceramic or glass.  If glass is intended, the charge should not be drawn as though transparent, through the use of voiding or chasing, but should be solidly tinctured.

For specific entries, see:  amphora, apothecary jar, barrel, bottell, bottle, churn, cup, flask, horn (drinking), ink bottle, pitcher, pot, saltcellar, tankard, tub, urinal, vase.  For related charges, see bowl, bucket, caldera gringolada, cupping-glass, frying pan, hourglass, mortar and pestle, water-bouget.

This entry was posted on June 8, 2014, in .

Pot; Cauldron

Fleshpot, or posnet (Period)

Fleshpot, or posnet (Period)

Cauldron (Period)

Cauldron (Period)

A pot is a round vessel, usually of metal, intended to hold food.  In medieval armory, the default form of pot is two-handled and three-legged; it is more fully called a “fleshpot” or (in the Randall Holme roll, c.1460) a “posnet”.  This form is found as early as c.1370, in the arms of von Spanheim [Gelre 44].

Another common form of pot was the “cauldron”:  more spherical in shape, with a bail handle, which may be called its defining trait.  The cauldron is hung over the fire by its handle to cook food; it’s sometimes called a “cooking pot” for that reason.  The cauldron is a period charge, found as early as c.1340 in the arms of Diessenhofen [Zurich 153].  In Society armory, it is sometimes drawn with a fire beneath it, or hanging from a tripod:  the arms of Larrea, mid-16th C., show a cauldron so suspended [Armeria 358].

Spouted pot (Period)

Spouted pot (Period)

Three-footed pot (Accepted)

Three-footed pot (Accepted)

There is also the “spouted pot”, called a pot à verser in French, used for storing and pouring liquid.  It’s found in the canting arms (German Weinkanne) of Schilling von Cannstatt, c.1450 [Scheibler 131; also Siebmacher 112].  The default form is with a single spout, facing dexter; two-spouted pots are also found, in the arms of von Stedenberg or Stettenberger, c.1450 [Ingeram 158, 269; also Siebmacher 104].  (The same French term, pot à verser, is also used for a slightly different pouring vessel, made of earthenware rather than metal.  This variant, blazoned in German as a Weinkrug, is found in the arms of von Prackbach, 1605 [Siebmacher 93].)

Pipkin (Accepted)

Pipkin (Accepted)

Kettle (Accepted)

Kettle (Accepted)

Of the various pots unique to Society armory, we find the “three-legged pot”, like the cauldron but three-footed and without a handle; the “pipkin”, a ceramic cooking vessel with three feet and a long handle, dating to the 15th Century; and the “kettle”, a metal cookery pot, not spherical like the cauldron, but wider than it is deep, with a lifting handle on both sides.  No difference is granted the various types of cookery pots.

There is also the “clay pot”, not metal but pottery:  a flat-bottomed, wide-mouthed crock (much like a modern flower-pot).

Clay pot (Accepted)

Clay pot (Accepted)

For related charges, see amphora, caldera gringolada, frying pan, ink bottle (ink pot), pitcher, vase (urn).  See also cat (in its curiosity).

Aubrey Ericsdatter bears:  Sable, three cauldrons Or.

Agnes Berengarii de Gerona bears:  Vert, five cauldrons in saltire Or.

Brekke Franksdottir bears:  Sable, a cooking pot hanging from a tripod above a base in flame argent.

Roberto Valason bears:  Argent, a peacock in its pride azure gorged of a pearled coronet argent between two barrulets between two spouted pots reversed vert.

William Taylor the Pure bears:  Per pale purpure and vert, a bear’s leg palewise issuant from base Or, maintaining a clay pot argent.

Claire le Potter bears:  Per bend sinister gules and azure, a kettle argent and a bordure Or.

Dametta of Arundel bears:  Per pale purpure and sable, a gryphon segreant maintaining a chalice, on a chief argent three posnets per pale purpure and sable.

Parlane of Glenord bears:  Pean, on a three-legged pot argent two dolphins haurient respectant sable.

Mons von Goarshausen bears as a badge:  Issuant from a pipkin sable a flame gules.

This entry was posted on May 27, 2014, in .

Penner and inkhorn

Penner and inkhorn (Period)

Penner and inkhorn (Period)

The penner and inkhorn is considered a single charge:  a cylindrical container for pens, connected by cords to an ink bottle.  It’s found in the armory borne by the Worshipful Company of Scriveners, 1530 (though not confirmed until 1634) [Bromley & Child 217].  For related charges, see penbox.

The College of Scribes of Caid bears:  A penner and inkhorn argent.

Salomea Imhof bears:  Purpure, three penners and inkhorns argent.

Samthann ingen Garbáin bears:  Argent, three penners and inkhorns azure.

This entry was posted on May 23, 2014, in .

Icicle

Icicle (Period)

Icicle (Period)

An icicle is a spike of ice, formed when water dripping from a roof freezes.  The charge is period, found in the arms of Herbotell or Harbottle, c.1295 [ANA2 477], but the name “icicle” may not be:  texts have suggested that they might be “hair bottles”, or possibly “gouts inverted”.  In any event, the charge seems confined to the arms of this family.  The icicle is palewise, point to base by default.

Carolina of Milan bears:  Argent semy of icicles, a daffodil plant vert with two blossoms, bells fesswise addorsed Or.

This entry was posted on February 12, 2014, in .

Horn

Hunting horn (Period)

Hunting horn (Period)

A horn is an artifact, made from an animal’s horn, from which it gets its name.  The default horn is a musical instrument, more fully blazoned a “hunting horn” or “bugle horn”; it is found in the canting arms of Hornes c.1275 [ANA2 476].  It’s usually shown hung on cords, and may be garnished in bands of another tincture; these are considered artistic details.  In mundane armory, the hunting horn’s default orientation has changed over time; the Society default is fesswise, embowed to base, with bell to dexter.

Drinking horn (Period)

Drinking horn (Period)

Another use of the horn is as a drinking vessel; this is blazoned a “drinking horn”.  Unlike the hunting horn, it has no mouthpiece, and is not corded; it was usually shown unadorned, but in at least one instance was depicted with feet (so it could be set on a table without spilling), in the arms of Müris, c.1340 [Zurich 94].  In medieval heraldry, it seems to have had the same default orientation as the hunting horn; in Society armory, its default orientation is palewise, embowed to dexter, with bell to chief.

Pairs of drinking horns are common in Saracenic heraldry, where they are referred to as “trousers of nobility” [Mayer 19]; but the motif is blazoned in most European contexts as “a pair of drinking horns”.  By Society convention, a pair of drinking horns is “addorsed” (i.e., with the convex sides facing each other) by default; a pair of drinking horns “respectant” will have their convex sides outward.  A “pair of drinking horns” is thus distinguished from “two drinking horns”, each in its default orientation.

Shofar (Accepted)

Shofar (Accepted)

Spiral hunting horn (Accepted)

Spiral hunting horn (Accepted)

Of the horns with special names, the best known is the “shofar”, the ram’s horn blown on Jewish high holidays.  Depictions of the shofar date back at least to the 4th Century, as seen on a Roman bowl now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.  Though not found as a period heraldic charge, as a period artifact, the shofar is registerable in the Society.

There’s also the “spiral horn”, more fully blazoned a “spiral hunting horn”.  This isn’t made from animal horn at all, but from metal:  essentially a flat spiral trumpet, the ancestor of the modern French horn.  The illustration is based on an artifact dated 1570 [Montagu 107]; as a period artifact, the spiral hunting horn is registerable in the Society, though no heraldic examples have been found.

As with the hunting horn, the shofar and the spiral horn have their bells to dexter by Society default.  For related charges, see cornetto, sackbut.  See also inkbottle, tooth.

The Shire of Darton bears:  Sable, a hunting horn within a laurel wreath Or.

Magnus Birchleg bears:  Gules, a drinking horn bendwise sinister argent.

Rivka bat Schmuel Alfasi bears:  Per fess indented azure and gules, in pale a shofar, bell to sinister, and an estoile of eight rays Or.

Nikolaj Zrogowacialy bears:  Barry argent and azure, a spiral horn of three spirals reversed Or.

This entry was posted on February 11, 2014, in .

Flask

Flask (Period)

Flask (Period)

Phial (Period)

Phial (Period)

A flask is a vessel, usually of glass or ceramic, with a constricted neck and a broad base.  Generally, the term implies a laboratory vessel, used for chemical or alchemical procedures:  the illustration is taken from de Bara, 1581 [132], who blazons it as un thalame philosophal.  The flask is a period charge, found in the canting arms (Italian fiasco) of Fiaschi, c.1550 [BSB Cod.Icon 278:305].

There is also the “phial”, intended to hold small amounts of fluid (frequently for medicinal use).  Phials are found in the arms of Adam de Rous, surgeon, 1379 [DBA3 42], and cited in Bossewell, 1572 [II.117].  The Society also has a similar charge, the “ampulla”, a small two-handled bottle used for relics, holy oil, &c.  It’s smaller and more spherical.

Alembic flask (Accepted)

Alembic flask (Accepted)

One specific type of flask is the “alembic flask”:  used for distillation, it has a long sloping spout.  It should not be confused with an “alembick”, which a post-period term for another charge altogether; for this reason, Society heraldry explicitly blazons it an “alembic flask“.  It’s also frequently blazoned a “retort”, especially when drawn with a smooth, unbroken surface.  As a charge, the alembic flask/retort seems to be unique to Society armory; its spout is to dexter by Society default.  For related charges, see bottle, urinal.

The Alchemy Guild of the Barony of Rivenstar bears:  Quarterly gules, azure, vert and sable, a retort reversed purpure fimbriated Or.

Vasco Pereira de Faria bears:  Per bend Or and argent, an alembic flask vert.

Robert of the Angels bears:  Azure, on a bend cotised between two flasks argent, a recorder, bell to chief sable.

Lorenzo Alhambra bears:  Vert, on a chevron between three flasks argent, two salamanders combattant vert enflamed gules.

Michael Tryggve bears:  Purpure, an ampulla Or, billety vert.

This entry was posted on January 28, 2014, in .

Dolphin

Dolphin (Period)

Dolphin (Period)

Natural dolphin naiant (Accepted)

Natural dolphin naiant (Accepted)

The dolphin was considered in medieval times the fastest and noblest of the fish.  The unmodified term refers to the heraldic form of the dolphin, which is the default:  a fierce fish with a spiny dorsal fin, and sometimes tusks.  It’s found in the canting arms of the Dauphin of France as early as c.1370 [Gelre 46].  The dolphin’s default posture is naiant; when blazoned “proper”, it is vert detailed gules.

The cetacean dolphin, as found in nature, must be specified as such in blazon, usually as a “natural” or “bottlenosed dolphin”.  When blazoned “proper”, it is colored in grey tones, and is considered equivalent to argent.  For related charges, see whale.

The Order of the Dolphin of Caid bears:  Azure, a dolphin embowed uriant to sinister argent.

Beatrice Delfini bears:  Per chevron argent ermined gules, and azure, a dolphin haurient embowed Or.

Diantha Sylvana Galatea Athalie de Castalia bears:  Per pale argent and azure, two dolphins uriant respectant counterchanged.

Angelina Nicollette de Beaumont bears:  Gules, a bottlenosed dolphin embowed and in chief a sprig of three orange blossoms slipped and leaved fesswise proper.

This entry was posted on January 12, 2014, in .